14 doctors weighed in:

Is cpap the only treatment for obstructive sleep apnea?

14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sal Aragona
Dentistry
4 doctors agree

In brief: No

According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.

In brief: No

According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.
Dr. Sal Aragona
Dr. Sal Aragona
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1 comment
Dr. James Andrea
CPAP is the standard but many people cannot tolerate or when they travel prefer something more portable. A TAP appliance can reposition the mandible to open the airway similar to CPR rescue breathing but any appliance that does this should be used with the knowledge that exercises to restore the normal position are necessary on a daily basis. Just 20 seconds to 2 min.
Dr. Craig Brown
Internal Medicine - Pulmonology
3 doctors agree

In brief: No

CPAP is the most accepted treatment for sleep apnea.
Some patients benefit from mouth pieces. There is also surgery for sleep apnea but it seems to help for a limited period of time.

In brief: No

CPAP is the most accepted treatment for sleep apnea.
Some patients benefit from mouth pieces. There is also surgery for sleep apnea but it seems to help for a limited period of time.
Dr. Craig Brown
Dr. Craig Brown
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3 comments
Dr. Patrick Melder
Surgery for the right patient can be very effective and can provide long term results.
Dr. James Donley
No. There are generally three options for treatment. A CPAP for many years has the gold standard of treatment. Oral appliances have been available for over 20 years. Surgery is often the treatment of last choice. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, in many cases and oral appliance by the appropriately trained dentist can be the treatment of choice.
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

Oral appliances are also a front-line treatment for snoring and mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea.
This small plastic device fits in the mouth during sleep unlike a sports mouth guard or orthodontic retainer it goes over both upper and lower jaws and positions the mandible forward to open the airway.

In brief: No

Oral appliances are also a front-line treatment for snoring and mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea.
This small plastic device fits in the mouth during sleep unlike a sports mouth guard or orthodontic retainer it goes over both upper and lower jaws and positions the mandible forward to open the airway.
Dr. Richard Leaderman
Dr. Richard Leaderman
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Dr. Vikas Jain
Internal Medicine - Sleep Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

There are alternatives including negative pressure therapy, theravent, surgical options, oral appliance, etc.
It looks like you may live in palo alto, ca. Go to stanford's sleep medicine center for a thorough evaluation!

In brief: No

There are alternatives including negative pressure therapy, theravent, surgical options, oral appliance, etc.
It looks like you may live in palo alto, ca. Go to stanford's sleep medicine center for a thorough evaluation!
Dr. Vikas Jain
Dr. Vikas Jain
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: NO

The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.

In brief: NO

The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
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Dr. Kirk Yen
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial

In brief: Alternatives exists

CPAP is usualy used becauses it is noninvasive.
Sometimes a dental specialist, prosthdontist, can fabricate a custom appliance to allow you to breath better when you sleep. Surgery to reduce the size of the uvula or to advance your upper and lower jaws to creat more space to prevent sleep apnea are alternatives to CPAC. Consult with your doctor to see if you are candidate for surgical referral.

In brief: Alternatives exists

CPAP is usualy used becauses it is noninvasive.
Sometimes a dental specialist, prosthdontist, can fabricate a custom appliance to allow you to breath better when you sleep. Surgery to reduce the size of the uvula or to advance your upper and lower jaws to creat more space to prevent sleep apnea are alternatives to CPAC. Consult with your doctor to see if you are candidate for surgical referral.
Dr. Kirk Yen
Dr. Kirk Yen
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Dr. David Schleimer
Dentistry - Orthodontics

In brief: No

If CPAP machine is intolerable and the apneic episodes pose a lethal danger, then it would be very wise to consult with a plastic reconstructive or maxillo-facial surgeon as they may recommend bimaxillary jaw advancement surgery in concert with an orthodontist who is skilled at this procedure.
Bringing both jaws forward can dramatically increase the airway and "cure" the sleep apnea.

In brief: No

If CPAP machine is intolerable and the apneic episodes pose a lethal danger, then it would be very wise to consult with a plastic reconstructive or maxillo-facial surgeon as they may recommend bimaxillary jaw advancement surgery in concert with an orthodontist who is skilled at this procedure.
Bringing both jaws forward can dramatically increase the airway and "cure" the sleep apnea.
Dr. David Schleimer
Dr. David Schleimer
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