Is cpap the only treatment for obstructive sleep apnea?

No. According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.
No. CPAP is the most accepted treatment for sleep apnea. Some patients benefit from mouth pieces. There is also surgery for sleep apnea but it seems to help for a limited period of time.
No. Oral appliances are also a front-line treatment for snoring and mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. This small plastic device fits in the mouth during sleep unlike a sports mouth guard or orthodontic retainer it goes over both upper and lower jaws and positions the mandible forward to open the airway.
No. There are alternatives including negative pressure therapy, theravent, surgical options, oral appliance, etc. It looks like you may live in palo alto, ca. Go to stanford's sleep medicine center for a thorough evaluation!
NO. The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea. But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.
Alternatives exists. CPAP is usualy used becauses it is noninvasive. Sometimes a dental specialist, prosthdontist, can fabricate a custom appliance to allow you to breath better when you sleep. Surgery to reduce the size of the uvula or to advance your upper and lower jaws to creat more space to prevent sleep apnea are alternatives to CPAC. Consult with your doctor to see if you are candidate for surgical referral.

Related Questions

Are alternative treatments to mild obstructive sleep apnea (AHI of 8/H) other than CPAP/BiPAP! Are there any side effects that will arise from them?

Tongue suspension. There are several solutions such as appliances or more permanent solutions... ie http://siestamedical.com/ - there are minimally invasive solutions for alternatives to patients intolerant of cpap. May want to talk to your ear nose throat physician. Read more...
Weight management. Depending on a patients weight, getting closer a BMI under 25 may be more successful in the long term for OSA and a variety of other health issues. Read more...
2. Weight loss may help. Dental sleep appliances usually useful. See evaluation by a dentist trained in sleep medicine. Read more...

Is "Provent Therapy" from sleep apnea as effective as a CPAP or at least 50% effective, compared to CPAP?

PROVENT vs CPAP. aa30 ~ this article shows that PROVENT is NOT recommended as an alternative to CPAP in moderate to severe sleep apnea. So stay on the CPAP for now http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23723343. Read more...
Provent therapy. Cpap is the gold standard and the most effective. Pro ent can help in mild apnea but really is not that effective for moderate to severe apnea. Maybe you should contact an ent who does sleep apnea surgery if you are not tolerating cpap. Good luck and feel better! Read more...

Dad has severe sleep apnea. Refuses to wear CPAP. Snores loudly and profusely. Any other treatments or suggestion?

Help him to undergo. his prescribed right treatment for his long term wellbeing and no short cuts . If he has weight problem ( most likely overweight ) make him to loose weight .Don't look for shortcuts as there are none , make sure he keeps his doctor's appointments. Read more...
Oral appliance. I'd go see a dentist about using a oral appliance. Different folks for different strokes as CPAP is a love/hate relationship and compliance may be better with a simple oral sleep apnea appliance. Read more...
Sleep Oral appliance. The sleep oral appliance therapy is an effective non-invasive treatment option for mild or moderate obstructive sleep. For severe or central sleep apnea CPAP or Bi-PAP is recommended. Surgery for OSA is usually not done unless other conservative treatments have failed. Read more...

Child with sleep apnea that does not stop breathing or snore and can not use cpap! Alternative treatments?

Adenotonsillectomy. First of all, make sure that the sleep apnea is confirmed with a sleep study. If your child does have sleep apnea, adenotonsillectomy (removal of the adenoids & tonsils surgically) is often curative in children. From NIH: "Adenotonsillectomy for OSA results in a dramatic improvement in respiratory parameters as measured by polysomnography in the majority of healthy children." Read more...
Doesn't make sense. By definition, during sleep apnea you stop breathing. We all cycle during breathing, meaning there is a brief period when there is no in/out going on. To have sleep apnea the period of no in/out is extended & blood oxygen level may drop significantly. This is at least a confusion of diagnosis or labeling. A true sleep study with proper video & oxygen assessment could sort this out. Read more...

Is sleep apnea related to COPD and/or asthma? What are some effective treatments for someone with sleep apnea and COPD - cpap, bipap, pillows?

Here we go? No, not related. Treatment is with a c-pap machine are others as you listed. Care is directed by someone trained in sleep disorders. You can have COPD and other lung diseases but not related to sleep apnea. Together, they are difficult. Read more...
No. Sleep apnea is not related to COPD or asthma. Sleep apnea and asthma sometimes share a common risk factor: obesity. Cpap/bipap therapy for sleep apnea can have the added benefit of providing additional support for people with advanced copd. CPAP is not indicated for the treatment of COPD in the home setting. Read more...
Sort of. Sleep apnea can be present in any patient, whether with COPD or not. Sleep apnea can make a COPD patient feel worse and do worse. The treatment can be anything that you mentioned: cpap, bipap. A sleep study will determine what treatment is best. Read more...

How will cpap help my obstructive sleep apnea?

Improve sleep qualit. Improves the quality of sleep so that you are more responsive during the day. Read more...
Splint. CPAP acts as a pneumatic splint to open a closed or partially closed airways - it is usually very effective. Read more...
Continous Pressure. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device..Continually introduces positive pressure either through your mouth or your nose (depending on the type of mask). This prevents the collapse of your tissues (tongue, soft palate, throat) from obstructing your breath while lying down. The exact pressure is determine by a titration study which is done before treatment is initiated. Read more...
Daytime fatigue. Do you snore ? Are you tired during the daytime? Do you have high blood pressure? All of these things can be helped with a cpap. It opens your airway at night and allows you to sleep without your brain waking you up because you have stopped breathing during the night-usually multiple times. A CPAP is the gold standard for treatment if you can wear it- if not we dentists can make an applliance. Read more...

Will I have to be on cpap for the rest of my life if I have obstructive sleep apnea?

Depends on the. Cause. Many cases of obstructive sleep apnea are due to obesity. In case you are overweight/obese, losing weight may obviate the need for cpap. Read more...
No. There are a number of treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea. If you are not tolerating CPAP or don't like it, discuss it with your sleep doctor. Read more...
Potentially. Sleep apnea tends to worsen with age rather than improve. Thus far the best technology we have to treat osa is cpap. There are alternatives such as oral appliances, surgery, and other alternatives which could be discussed with a sleep specialist. Weight loss can help - every 10% loss in weight can lead to a 30% improvement in the severity of your sleep apnea. Read more...
Often. Often. Some factors can be controlled. Losing weight helps. Some patients can get by with dental appliances. Others who find CPAP intolerable may benefit from surgical treatment. Make sure you discuss all your options with your sleep doctor. Read more...