What is 'poor sleep hygiene'?

Sleep Hygiene. Poor sleep hygiene includes exercising right before bed, reading and watching tv in bed, not following a sleep schedule (set wake time and sleep time), drinking alcohol before bed, laying in bed awake for greater than 10 minutes, going to bed anxious. These are just a few "bad habits" that contribute to poor sleep hygiene.
The opposite of this. Sleep hygiene (going to sleep regularly at the same time, no lights or noises, avoid certain meals, not doing other things -like reading/watching tv- in bed, etc.).
Things like - going to bed with the radio or TV on. Going to bed & getting up at varied times (lack of consistency).
Eating large meals before bed. Lack of regular excericse - or engaging in strenous activity right before you go to bed. Drinking lots of alcohol. Caffiene use late during day. Having lights on when you are trying to sleep. Checking your alarm clock over and over. Etc.

Related Questions

Why does poor sleep hygiene (4am-11am) make you feel sick, tired throughout the day? Should you just force a wake up at 9am and re-adjust? Ideas?

Body needs sleep. Our sleep is tied to daylight- the so-called circadian rhythm. If we don't sleep during darkness our sleep can be poor. Read more...
Poor sleep hygiene? Sleep hygiene can be practiced at any time of the day, not just at night. This means waking ; sleeping @ same time daily. Some people work odd hours, so must sleep in daytime. Darkness and quiet can be hard to come by in daytime hours, making sleep less sound. Do you work at night, or are you simply choosing to stay up until 4am? Do you use alcohol or other drugs? Caffeine? All these matter. Read more...

Please explain to me what is sleep hygiene?

Sleep Hygiene . This refers to the environment in which you are attempting to sleep. Is there darkness or does light invade the sleeping space? How about noise? How cluttered is the bed or the surrounding area of the bed? Is tv on or is the radio on? Read more...
Sleep hygiene. Sleep hygiene refers to the habits you keep regarding sleep. It helps to develop a bedtime routine, which signals your body to start winding down for sleep. Keep consistent sleep & wake times. Avoid strenuous exercise, alcohol, and meals 3 hours before bad -- no caffeine after noon (if at all). Soft music, comfy bed with cool temperature and darkness; no tv. More: http://tinyurl.Com/mhxjf3s. Read more...

How can you improve sleep hygiene?

Dark and quiet. No lights, no smart phones, no tv, no stimulants. Establish a routine and follow it. Avoid napping before bedtime. No late exercise? Just a few things o consider . Read more...
Better sleep hygiene. Habits that are not conducive to good sleep quality are intake of caffeine, alcohol, nicotine or excess food too close to bedtime. Also physical exercise too close to the time of sleep is not helpful. Keeping a consitent bedtime, with the same environment will promote a better sleep-wake cycle rhythm. Read more...
Things to do. Retire & rise same time each day. Bedroom should be dark & cool - used only for sex & sleep. Turn off tv. No naps. Exercise regularly but not in late evening. No caffeine for 6 hrs & no alcohol or tobacco w/i 2 hrs of sleep. Dinner should be moderate sized & finished at least 2 to 3 hours before sleep. Can try warm milk, chamomile tea or melatonin along w light reading, warm bath, lavender scent. Read more...
See below. Establish time when you would like to go to bed. Create a bed time routine: warm showers, room on a slightly cooler side. Learn relaxation exercises to help put your body in a "i'm sleeeeeepy mode" :). Don't use your bedroom as your office. Try to avoid afternoon naps, no caffeine after 3-4 pm. Use your bed for sleep and sex only. Our body likes schedules and routines. Remember that:). Read more...

What are important steps to improve sleep hygiene?

Several. It is best to establish a sleep routine. Retire at the same time each night, always in a bed (not the sofa), avoid caffeine and alcohol 3-4 hrs prior to sleep, avoid eating and exercising close to bedtime. Establish a quiet setting, dark, cool room, etc. Make sure your mattress and pillow are comfortable too. These things will help. Read more...
Steps. 1.Keep regular bed & waking time (even weekends). Rise same time each day, regardless of time you fell asleep. 2. Develop relaxing bedtime routine: warm bath/shower, aromatherapy, reading, or listening to gentle music. 3. Sleep in dark, quiet, cool room w comfortable mattress & pillows. 4. Bedroom is only for sleep & sex. No work materials, computers, & TV in room. 5. Finish eating at least 2-3 hr. Read more...

Does sleep hygiene mean being clean before you go to bed?

NO. Sleep hygiene encompasses good habits, sleep environment that are conducive to sleep. For instance, keeping regular bedtimes and wake up times, using your bedroom only for sleep rather than tv watching, etc. It also means keeping healthy eating and drinking before bed such as avoiding caffeine or sugar right before bed. Remember to think of sleep as part of a healthy lifestyle. Read more...
Not specificly. Sleep hygiene is more to do with having a good routine for ending your day & excluding those factors known to interrupt sleep. Avoiding large meals before bedtime that could promote reflux, avoiding foods or drinks that include things like caffeine or alcohol that can promote urine flow & interruption of sleep for a potty run.Disposing of the days problems in a way that you can get productive rest. Read more...
No (: Retire & rise same time each day. Keep bedroom dark & cool & use only for sex & sleep. Turn off tv. No naps. Exercise regularly but not in late evening. No caffeine for 6 hrs & no alcohol or tobacco w/i 2 hrs of sleep. Keep dinner moderate sized & finish at least 2 to 3 hrs before sleep. Can try warm milk, Chamomile tea or melatonin along w light reading, warm bath or lavender scent. Read more...

What is the most important part of sleep hygiene?

Dark and quiet. No lights, no smart phones, no tv, no stimulants. Establish a routine and follow it. Avoid napping before bedtime. No late exercise? Just a few things o consider . Read more...
Better Sleep Hygiene. The most important part of sleep hygiene is avoiding the things that interrupt sleep such as caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, excess food or exercise too close to the desired sleep time. It can also be helpful to keep the same environment and sleep schedule to develop a good sleep-wake cycle. Read more...
Quiet/ dark. You have received great info. I would say that if i had to make a priority - it would be quiet & dark environment. Here are more: retire & rise same time each day. Keep bedroom dark & cool & use only for sex & sleep. Turn off tv. No naps. Exercise regularly but not in late evening. No caffeine for 6 hrs & no alcohol or tobacco w/i 2 hrs of sleep. Keep dinner moderate sized & finish at least 2 to 3. Read more...

How can I make sleep health / sleep hygiene better?

Sleep hygiene. Retire ; rise same time each day. Keep bedroom dark ; cool ; use only for sex ; sleep. Turn off tv. No naps. Exercise regularly but not in late evening. No caffeine for 6 hrs ; no alcohol or tobacco w/i 2 hrs of sleep. Keep dinner moderate sized ; finish at least 2 to 3 hrs before sleep. Can try warm milk, chamomile tea or melatonin along w light reading, warm bath or lavender scent. Read more...
See below. Establish time when you would like to go to bed. Create a bed time routine: warm showers, room on a slightly cooler side. Learn relaxation exercises to help put your body in a "i'm sleeeeeepy mode" :). Don't use your bedroom as your office. Try to avoid afternoon naps, no caffeine after 3-4 pm. Use your bed for sleep and sex only. Our body likes schedules and routines. Remember that:). Read more...

How can you have good sleep hygiene with fibromyalgia when your pain levels are always so high?

It's tough . I hear you. It's tough. Basically it involves no caffeine or alcohol, daily exercise, no naps, and meds. I prefer Gabapentin or Lyrica (pregabalin) for this aspect of fibro. Read more...
Treat the cause. It looks like you are on meds that may help symptoms but do nothing to address the cause of fibromyalgia. See http://www.Endfatigue.Com/ and dr. Teitelbaum's books. A supplement called fibronol is proven to significantly help sleep in patients with fibromyalgia. See http://www.Fibronol.Com/clinical_test.Html magnesium taurate or glycinate and glycine are among other supplements that help sleep. Read more...
Chalenging. There has been a very old argument as to whether the sleep disorder or the pain comes first! the sleep disorder that is one of the diagnostic criteria seems to involve an imbalance between rem (dream) sleep and the deepest stage of sleep (stage 4) excessive dreaming is common and the feeling of awakening feeling like you worked all night is common. Tricyclic antidepressants are a treatment. Read more...

What meds are best for sleep onset insomnia? Please don't say sleep hygiene. I am a true insomniac.

Many choices. Although there are many choices - we use melatonin in my home. We find sublingual more effective than tablets. Good luck. Read more...
There are quite. a few meds available to help get people to fall asleep. Melatonin is natural hormone and available with different preps (liquid most common). The Ambien and Lunesta (eszopiclone) shortens the latency period to stage I sleep. The benzodiazepines relax you a bit to accelerate your muscles and brain activity towards relaxation for sleep. Others like amitryptyline more helps to keep you asleep. Read more...
Insomnia. Let me ask you: are you experiencing excessive anxiety in your waking life that ostensibly impinges on your ability to relax enough to be able to sleep? If so, I would recommend meds if needed, COMBINED with psychotherapy, to find out about the anxiety, and any other emotional issues that you face. Read more...
Some are better. For strictly sleep onset insomnia, the best medications are those that are fast acting and short acting -- so you don't have to worry about a morning sedation from the medicine. Discuss this with your doctor, remembering the need for caution with respect to addiction and other side effects. Read more...
Numerous. Please have an insomnia evaluation, either with a psychiatrist or a sleep specialist, and which may include a sleep study depending upon the results of your evaluation. Once you’ve had an evaluation, medical causes for insomnia have been ruled out, among other issues, appropriate medications to meet your specific needs can then be initiated to address your sleep problem. Good luck! Read more...
Chronic Insomnia. Sleep-onset insomnia is often a symptom of Anxiety due to Stress. Let the wise woman within you ask: Stresses in your journey of life which could be-marriage, separation, divorce, relationships, children leaving the home, past unresolved feelings and conflicts, loneliness, work and finances See Psychiatrist to discuss Ambien, Lunesta (eszopiclone) or Restoril for short term; and Therapy. Read more...