9 doctors weighed in:

What is a safe kid's toothpaste?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Pulliam
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Any with fluoride

The american academy of pediatric dentistry recommends using a Fluoride toothpaste as soon as teeth are present.
Use a smear in children less than 2 years old and a pea-sized amount in children 2-5 years old. Have them spit out the excess after brushing when they are old enough. The children's ones with Fluoride tend to have better flavors than the ones for adults.

In brief: Any with fluoride

The american academy of pediatric dentistry recommends using a Fluoride toothpaste as soon as teeth are present.
Use a smear in children less than 2 years old and a pea-sized amount in children 2-5 years old. Have them spit out the excess after brushing when they are old enough. The children's ones with Fluoride tend to have better flavors than the ones for adults.
Dr. Patrick Pulliam
Dr. Patrick Pulliam
Thank
Dr. Don Millner
Dentistry - Cosmetic
2 doctors agree

In brief: OneWithout fluoride!

If you are really looking for safety, look for a toothpaste without the toxicity of fluoride.
While I am an advocate for fluoridated water, which is incredibly effective at strengthening teeth and preventing tooth decay, Fluoride in toothpaste has minimal value ....Unless you have a child who gets it into his blood stream (and into the developing tooth) by dangerously ingesting it!

In brief: OneWithout fluoride!

If you are really looking for safety, look for a toothpaste without the toxicity of fluoride.
While I am an advocate for fluoridated water, which is incredibly effective at strengthening teeth and preventing tooth decay, Fluoride in toothpaste has minimal value ....Unless you have a child who gets it into his blood stream (and into the developing tooth) by dangerously ingesting it!
Dr. Don Millner
Dr. Don Millner
Thank
Dr. Jeffrey Collura
Dentistry - Cosmetic

In brief: Age dependent

As mentioned above the the ability to spit is really the key determinant.
The earlier you can teach your child to spit the toothpaste, the better, as the benefits of topical Fluoride are well documented. However, you do not want the child ingesting more than is necessary, so once they can spit, Fluoride toothpaste of any kind is best. For infants/t orajel's training toothpaste is a good product.

In brief: Age dependent

As mentioned above the the ability to spit is really the key determinant.
The earlier you can teach your child to spit the toothpaste, the better, as the benefits of topical Fluoride are well documented. However, you do not want the child ingesting more than is necessary, so once they can spit, Fluoride toothpaste of any kind is best. For infants/t orajel's training toothpaste is a good product.
Dr. Jeffrey Collura
Dr. Jeffrey Collura
Thank
Dr. Gilberto Nunez
Dentistry - Cosmetic

In brief: Depends on age

If the child can rinse his mouth and spit , you can use any toothpaste.
If is too young and doesn't understand the concept of rinsing abs spitting then you need something without Fluoride in its composition , most toothpaste companies have one.

In brief: Depends on age

If the child can rinse his mouth and spit , you can use any toothpaste.
If is too young and doesn't understand the concept of rinsing abs spitting then you need something without Fluoride in its composition , most toothpaste companies have one.
Dr. Gilberto Nunez
Dr. Gilberto Nunez
Thank
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics

In brief: Depends on situation

In those who are too young to understand the need to spit it out, just use paste that has no fluoride.
Swallowing even small amounts of fluoridated paste can eventually produce wavy lines within the enamel of teeth that are forming at the time. Once the kid is conversational enough to understand the swallowing taboo, use one with fluoride.

In brief: Depends on situation

In those who are too young to understand the need to spit it out, just use paste that has no fluoride.
Swallowing even small amounts of fluoridated paste can eventually produce wavy lines within the enamel of teeth that are forming at the time. Once the kid is conversational enough to understand the swallowing taboo, use one with fluoride.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
13 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors