14 doctors weighed in:

Are bad teeth genetic?

14 doctors weighed in
6 doctors agree

In brief: No - Bacteria

Bacteria cause cavities.
Infants are born without the bacteria. The bacteria can be passed from parents, grandparents, caregivers to an infant by sharing food utensils. When exposed to simple sugars, the bacteria create acid, which damages tooth structure (forming a cavity). For more info google: strep mutans.

In brief: No - Bacteria

Bacteria cause cavities.
Infants are born without the bacteria. The bacteria can be passed from parents, grandparents, caregivers to an infant by sharing food utensils. When exposed to simple sugars, the bacteria create acid, which damages tooth structure (forming a cavity). For more info google: strep mutans.
Dr. Justin Zumstein
Dr. Justin Zumstein
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Can be

There are three things that can impact whether teeth are bad or not.
1, genetics 2. Diet.. Including medications or drugs 3. Care of the teeth if someone has "soft teeth" it may be improved with good hygiene and a good diet.

In brief: Can be

There are three things that can impact whether teeth are bad or not.
1, genetics 2. Diet.. Including medications or drugs 3. Care of the teeth if someone has "soft teeth" it may be improved with good hygiene and a good diet.
Dr. John Van der Werff
Dr. John Van der Werff
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Dr. Meng Syn
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

In my 30 year career, seeing patients from 4 generations of families, and treating identical and fraternal twins, i believe there is a significant genetic element with respect to susceptibility.
In many cases people develop decay symmetrically . We have a set of twins in our practice that have developed identical cavities on opposite sides . Good hygiene and diet are still important.

In brief: Yes

In my 30 year career, seeing patients from 4 generations of families, and treating identical and fraternal twins, i believe there is a significant genetic element with respect to susceptibility.
In many cases people develop decay symmetrically . We have a set of twins in our practice that have developed identical cavities on opposite sides . Good hygiene and diet are still important.
Dr. Meng Syn
Dr. Meng Syn
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Dr. Ragan Faler
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Not a simple answer

Although i agree with my colleagues that for the most part, most "bad" teeth are lost due to bacterial infection of the tooth or gum, there is a genetic aspect to this.
Early onset periodontitis and other gum diseases, although bacterial in origin, are strongly associated with hyper immune response or cellular chemotactic defects. Also varying gingival profiles lead to uncontrollable recession.

In brief: Not a simple answer

Although i agree with my colleagues that for the most part, most "bad" teeth are lost due to bacterial infection of the tooth or gum, there is a genetic aspect to this.
Early onset periodontitis and other gum diseases, although bacterial in origin, are strongly associated with hyper immune response or cellular chemotactic defects. Also varying gingival profiles lead to uncontrollable recession.
Dr. Ragan Faler
Dr. Ragan Faler
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Dr. Cristina Carballo
Pediatrics - Neonatology

In brief: No

Bad teeth are caused by poor hygiene from infancy and through childhood as well as lack of floride to protect them.

In brief: No

Bad teeth are caused by poor hygiene from infancy and through childhood as well as lack of floride to protect them.
Dr. Cristina Carballo
Dr. Cristina Carballo
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1 comment
Dr. Brian Oyler
Also a poor diet will cause teeth to decay.
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