8 doctors weighed in:

How do you treat tmj?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ronald Achong
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
3 doctors agree

In brief: Depends of the cause

There are many treatments available that range from surgery, to physical therapy and to splint therapy.
Have your dentist evaluate you.

In brief: Depends of the cause

There are many treatments available that range from surgery, to physical therapy and to splint therapy.
Have your dentist evaluate you.
Dr. Ronald Achong
Dr. Ronald Achong
Thank
Dr. Steven Bender
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Diagnosis

In order to effectively treat disorders of the tmjs, one must first discern if the problem is arthrogenous (boney), myogenous (muscular) or a combination.
Most TMJ disorders are myogenous and therapies would be consistant with treating other muscular disorders: rest, ice/heat, physical therapy, medications, congnative behavioral therapies and in some cases, oral splints.

In brief: Diagnosis

In order to effectively treat disorders of the tmjs, one must first discern if the problem is arthrogenous (boney), myogenous (muscular) or a combination.
Most TMJ disorders are myogenous and therapies would be consistant with treating other muscular disorders: rest, ice/heat, physical therapy, medications, congnative behavioral therapies and in some cases, oral splints.
Dr. Steven Bender
Dr. Steven Bender
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Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: IMS

C. Chan gunn, md uses dry needling to release the muscles of mastication.
Curative treatment ... Anything less is a pacifier. You have to get your doctor to use solid or hypodermic needles to release the muscles. Heat, stretching and massage are part of the treatment.

In brief: IMS

C. Chan gunn, md uses dry needling to release the muscles of mastication.
Curative treatment ... Anything less is a pacifier. You have to get your doctor to use solid or hypodermic needles to release the muscles. Heat, stretching and massage are part of the treatment.
Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
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1 comment
Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
Begin a self-care Wellness Program of Vits, Magnesium, sleep, self/pro Massage, chiropractor, heat, stretching. I use acupuncture and trigger point shots! See other answers.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial

In brief: A few things

Depends on symptoms, and cause of symptoms.
3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments.

In brief: A few things

Depends on symptoms, and cause of symptoms.
3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Dr. Louis Gallia
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Dr. Gary Lederman
Dentistry

In brief: Other options

Muscle relaxation can be achieved without needles.
Ultra low frequency tens in combination with a properly designed and adjusted anatomical orthosis (bite splint) can completely resolve the symptoms of tmj/tmd.

In brief: Other options

Muscle relaxation can be achieved without needles.
Ultra low frequency tens in combination with a properly designed and adjusted anatomical orthosis (bite splint) can completely resolve the symptoms of tmj/tmd.
Dr. Gary Lederman
Dr. Gary Lederman
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2 comments
Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
Yes that is the power of myofascial release therapy. I use the same in simple cases. If all docs were on board to this and other simple office and home based therapies ... joint surgery would never need to be an option. Once the muscles, tissues and ligaments trigger point density reaches a critical level even needles will only pacify the pain and dysfunction. Attack the problem early and with full force. Don't be afraid to add in the needles ... even a 30-31g dry needle can work wonders!!!!
Dr. Gary Lederman
Travel was a pioneer! I agree with your assessment, with the only addition that to the degree the bite contributes to the condition, supporting the bite adds to the success of your techniques
Dr. Gregg Albers
Addiction Medicine

In brief: Treating TMJ

Temporal mandibular joint disease (TMJ) is a pain in the jaw joint and jaw muscles related to grinding or gritting your teeth at night, malocclusion, stress, and excessive use of gum or other chewable substance.
Simple pain medications over the counter, stress reduction, and possibly a muscle relaxant can help. A dental appliance called a bite block may be needed when meds fail.

In brief: Treating TMJ

Temporal mandibular joint disease (TMJ) is a pain in the jaw joint and jaw muscles related to grinding or gritting your teeth at night, malocclusion, stress, and excessive use of gum or other chewable substance.
Simple pain medications over the counter, stress reduction, and possibly a muscle relaxant can help. A dental appliance called a bite block may be needed when meds fail.
Dr. Gregg Albers
Dr. Gregg Albers
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1 comment
Dr. Stephen Rodrigues
All non-infectious/cancer pain IS caused by muscle and/or connective tissue (Myofascial) until proven otherwise. The way to prove this is by relentlessly treating it with myofascial therapies. All myofascial pain is treatable! Janet G. Travell, M.D., George Stuart Hackett, M.D., C. Chan Gunn, M.D., David G. Simons and many other respected pioneers in myofascial pain. Here is a list of the most powerful myofascial therapy in order of complexity. Massage, Wellness, Stretching, Spray and Stretch, Chiropractic manipulations, acupuncture, IMS, trigger points injections.
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