6 doctors weighed in:

How does your diaphragm help you breathe?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Cooke
Surgery - Thoracic
3 doctors agree

In brief: Like a bellows

The diaphragm is a muscle.
When it contracts it moves downward creating negative pressure in the lungs and causing air to enter the lungs. When it relaxes, positive pressure is created in the lungs, causing air to be expelled. When part of the diaphragm does not work it is difficult to breathe.

In brief: Like a bellows

The diaphragm is a muscle.
When it contracts it moves downward creating negative pressure in the lungs and causing air to enter the lungs. When it relaxes, positive pressure is created in the lungs, causing air to be expelled. When part of the diaphragm does not work it is difficult to breathe.
Dr. David Cooke
Dr. David Cooke
Thank
Dr. Craig Brown
Internal Medicine - Pulmonology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Diaphragm

The diaphragm is a muscle that separates the respiratory system from the abdomen.
It is a muscle that contracts and relaxes. When you inspire, it relaxes. When you expire, it contracts. For the most part, it is an involuntary action, but can be voluntary as well. It is the main muscle associated with respiration.

In brief: Diaphragm

The diaphragm is a muscle that separates the respiratory system from the abdomen.
It is a muscle that contracts and relaxes. When you inspire, it relaxes. When you expire, it contracts. For the most part, it is an involuntary action, but can be voluntary as well. It is the main muscle associated with respiration.
Dr. Craig Brown
Dr. Craig Brown
Thank
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