How many different heart birth defects are there?

Many. There are heart defects that involve the connecting blood vessels in intrauterine life. There are defects involving the valves of the heart and incomplete closure of the walls between the chambers, in addition to any combination of the above. There are also conditions where the chambers fail to form properly.
Several. There are several types of heart defects, but doctors usually classify them into several broad categories. Cyanotic defects cause your baby to turn cyanotic, or blue. Obstructive defects block the normal flow of blood through the heart and its associated blood vessels. Septal defects cause "holes" between the heart's chambers. And hypoplastic defects make one side of the heart smaller.

Related Questions

What causes birth defects of the heart?

Several factors. The heart develops rather early so medication exposure in the first trimester can sometimes cause heart problems. Chromosomal or genetic issues also can cause heart problems, . Read more...
Folic acid deficient. Folic acid deficieny can cause fetal heart defects! multiple genetic, drug, medical and environmental factors can predispose to fetal heart defects. Read more...
Missinformation. Heart defects occur sporadically and may reflect genetic,chromosomal, or toxic effects.Inheritance risk runs about 4% for any defect if one parent has one. There are some inherited syndromes that may have a heart defect where risk is up to 50%..Toxic effects (fetal alcohol) depends on timing and amount.Kids with abnormal chromosomes will often have a heart defect. Read more...

What are the causes of heart birth defects?

Cells getting lost. It's a nonspecific question you asked, but most "congenital heart defects" are caused by the cells failing to go where they're supposed to as the heart is developing. That's why the majority of these problems require surgical correction; because something just isn't in the right place. Read more...
Genes, environ, luck. A mix of genetics, exposure & chance. The formation of the heart is a very complex process as a simple vascular tube transforms into a specialized pump intertwining 2 separate circulations. Sometimes cells fail to migrate or grow-->may lead to septal defects. Structures may not form, and if they interfere with bloodflow (e.g., valve not opening), then downstream structures don't grow or develop. Read more...

Are heart birth defects cause for major concern?

Yes. Some more than others. Vsd, a type of "hole in the heart", sometimes closes on its own, while others may be life-threatening within minutes of birth. Read more...
Yes. Sometimes heart defects are causes for major concern, especially if the baby has trouble breathing or turns blue. If your baby has symptoms, doctors will evaluate your baby's heart with a chest xray, ekg, and echocardiogram. If a serious defect is found, the baby may need medicine or surgery. Many times, though, small defects or holes are found that don't affect your baby or child very much. Read more...

How frequently does the hole in heart birth defect occur?

2-5/1000 births. The VSD (hole between lower chambers) is the most common reported heart defect.It occurs as an isolated event or along with other defects. The majority close in early infancy and are not clinically significant. Read more...

What is the likelihood of hole in heart birth defect occur?

Depends. It depends on the size, the type, and what methods are used to look for it. Broadly, atrial septal defect occurs in 1 in 1500 live births. Patent foramen ovale is extremely common and present in 10-20% of all adults but not significant. Read more...

How do I help manage my child's heart birth defect?

Variable. Some defects like small ventriculoseptal defects close all by themselves and require no intervention, others like hypoplastic left heart require transplant. Unfortunately how you manage the defect depends upon the exact nature of the disease. Read more...
Get Good Advice. The best way to help manage a heart birth defect is to first identify the problem. Then seek advice from a qualified pediatrician or if more complicated, a pediatric cardiologist. Some heart birth defects actually disappear with age. Some are permanent, but harmless. Others require more intense therapy or even surgery.Your doctor can guide you. Read more...
Educate yourself. Because there is a wide range of heart defects, the best thing you can do to manage your child's defect is to learn as much about it as possible. Your child's pediatric cardiologist can inform you about what to look for as signs that your baby may be having more trouble and may need to see the doctor. Learn about the baby's medications, and if surgery is needed learn about it before it happens. Read more...
Develop a logbook. One of the best things one of my patients mom's did over the years was develop a log book.In it she always had detailed information about each physician involved in her daughters care.There were updated schematics of what the heart defect was, and what shunt/repairs were in place. There were med lists and when started/stopped. The other data was always quite helpful when I needed to review it. Read more...
All of the above. The answers you have received are very helpful. The specific care depends on the heart condition your child has; I would leave that to your child's cardiologist. But educating yourself and creating a log book can be especially helpful. Read more...

What are the treatments for heart-related birth defects?

If a treatment is... ...Needed at all, it is usually, sooner or later, surgical. An interim treatment with medication such as diuretics may be needed before surgery. Read more...
Surgery or Waiting. Of course the answer depends on the type of defect. Some require immediate surgery, and others may resolve themselves with time. Your pediatrician should refer you to a pediatric cardiologist to direct you in the proper management of the condition. Read more...
Depends. The best way to help manage a heart birth defect is to first identify the problem. Then seek advice from a qualified pediatrician or if more complicated, a pediatric cardiologist. Some heart birth defects actually disappear with age. Some are permanent, but harmless. Others require more intense therapy or even surgery.Your doctor can guide you. Read more...
Surgery, medication. Many congenital heart defects require surgery, but when surgery is done and how many operations may be required depends completely on what the specific defect is. Other heart defects are not as severe and may be able to be managed with medication alone. Talk with your child's pediatric cardiologist to learn what to do for your baby's heart defect. You may be told to just wait and watch. Read more...
Depends on type. Heart defects are variable from those that improve on their own given a few months like a small vsd to those that require heart transplant like hypoplastic left heart. Read more...

Are heart valve abnormalities classified as birth defects?

Yes. Children's heart valve abnormalities are classified as birth defects if the abnormalities were present at birth, which is the usual case. A person can get a heart valve defect later, such as due to infection or trauma. Read more...
Some. A bicuspid aortic valve or a prolapsing mitral valve are present from birth. Many other heart valve abnormalities are acquired, either through scarring from infection, calcium deposition, or mal-apposition due to dilatation of cardiac chambers, among other things. Read more...