3 doctors weighed in:
My eyes are constantly bloodshot. Is this normal?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jay Bradley
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery
In brief: No
Bloodshot eyes are caused by many issues which cause dilation of existing vessels and an increase in vessels over time.
You should see an eye doctor to treat the underlying cause.

In brief: No
Bloodshot eyes are caused by many issues which cause dilation of existing vessels and an increase in vessels over time.
You should see an eye doctor to treat the underlying cause.
Dr. Jay Bradley
Dr. Jay Bradley
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Dr. Theodore Wu
Ophthalmology
In brief: Bloodshot
Eyes are bloodshot due to many things, such as dry eye, allergy, alcohol consumption, conjunctivitis.
Try some over the counter artificial tears, such as theratears or hypotears. Put them every 3-4 hours for a day or two. If your symptoms persist, call your local ophthalmologist.

In brief: Bloodshot
Eyes are bloodshot due to many things, such as dry eye, allergy, alcohol consumption, conjunctivitis.
Try some over the counter artificial tears, such as theratears or hypotears. Put them every 3-4 hours for a day or two. If your symptoms persist, call your local ophthalmologist.
Dr. Theodore Wu
Dr. Theodore Wu
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Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Ophthalmology
In brief: Depends
Chronic eye redness is not normal, but most often is related to benign conditions including sleep deprivation, allergies and dry eyes.
Associated symptoms are itching and watery discharge with allergies and foreign body sensation/irritation/scratchiness with dry eyes. Other conditions leading to eye redness are ultraviolet sun damage to the conjunctiva in people from tropical climates. These lesions are called pterygia and pingueculae and, though bothersome and sometimes unsightly, are not malignant or dangerous. They may, however, cause visual changes if they overgrow the cornea. Additional, more serious causes of eye redness include infections such as viral conjunctivitis but these are self limited and associated with ropy, yellow discharge; uveitis (inflammation of the uvea, the inner eye coat: iris, ciliary body and choroid) which can cause eye redness with pain, vision loss and photohobia (aversion to light) and may be chronic and should be evaluated; and episcleritis/scleritis (inflammation of the white part of the eye: the sclera and its outer coat) to which young women are particularly prone and which may be related to autoimmune conditions such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Orbital inflammatory syndrome and glaucoma are additional causes which should be evaluated. More serious and dangerous conditions include those conditions that may cause reduced venous blood return from the eyes such as cavernous sinus thrombosis and carotid cavernous fistula, but these are pretty rare and associated with limited eye movement, double vision, pain and proptosis (eyes jutting out of sockets). In short, if you have chronic eye redness, you probably don’t have much to worry about, but you should have it checked out sooner rather than later.

In brief: Depends
Chronic eye redness is not normal, but most often is related to benign conditions including sleep deprivation, allergies and dry eyes.
Associated symptoms are itching and watery discharge with allergies and foreign body sensation/irritation/scratchiness with dry eyes. Other conditions leading to eye redness are ultraviolet sun damage to the conjunctiva in people from tropical climates. These lesions are called pterygia and pingueculae and, though bothersome and sometimes unsightly, are not malignant or dangerous. They may, however, cause visual changes if they overgrow the cornea. Additional, more serious causes of eye redness include infections such as viral conjunctivitis but these are self limited and associated with ropy, yellow discharge; uveitis (inflammation of the uvea, the inner eye coat: iris, ciliary body and choroid) which can cause eye redness with pain, vision loss and photohobia (aversion to light) and may be chronic and should be evaluated; and episcleritis/scleritis (inflammation of the white part of the eye: the sclera and its outer coat) to which young women are particularly prone and which may be related to autoimmune conditions such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Orbital inflammatory syndrome and glaucoma are additional causes which should be evaluated. More serious and dangerous conditions include those conditions that may cause reduced venous blood return from the eyes such as cavernous sinus thrombosis and carotid cavernous fistula, but these are pretty rare and associated with limited eye movement, double vision, pain and proptosis (eyes jutting out of sockets). In short, if you have chronic eye redness, you probably don’t have much to worry about, but you should have it checked out sooner rather than later.
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
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