7 doctors weighed in:

Is it true that carrots help your night vision?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Ophthalmology
5 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

The basis for this "old wive's tale" is that, accurately, carrots as well as other yellow/orange vegetables and gourds (squash, pumpkin) are fantastic sources of vitamin a, an essential vitamin required for photoreceptor (cone/rod) metabolism. While severe vitamin a deficiency may lead to serious, but generally reversible, vision problems, such as night blindness, most people in developed countries meet more than their daily vitamin a requirements from normal diets and there is no need to consume exorbitant amounts of carrots.
In fact, vitamin a excess may be toxic to the liver and some clinical studies have demonstrated that excess vitamin a metabolites may actually be potentially toxic to photoreceptors.

In brief: Depends

The basis for this "old wive's tale" is that, accurately, carrots as well as other yellow/orange vegetables and gourds (squash, pumpkin) are fantastic sources of vitamin a, an essential vitamin required for photoreceptor (cone/rod) metabolism. While severe vitamin a deficiency may lead to serious, but generally reversible, vision problems, such as night blindness, most people in developed countries meet more than their daily vitamin a requirements from normal diets and there is no need to consume exorbitant amounts of carrots.
In fact, vitamin a excess may be toxic to the liver and some clinical studies have demonstrated that excess vitamin a metabolites may actually be potentially toxic to photoreceptors.
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Theodore Wu
Studies also show that green leafy vegetables and fruits rich in antioxidants, such as blueberries and blackberries, are beneficial to the eyes.
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Ophthalmology

In brief: To a degree

Carrots contain a high level of vitamin a, which is important for the proper functioning of the receptors in the retina (the eye's film layer).
People who are deficient in vitamin a can develop night blindness, but it rarely occurs in developed countries. In fact, we usually ingest enough vitamin a from meats and vegetbles in our regular diet that it often does not need to be supplemented.

In brief: To a degree

Carrots contain a high level of vitamin a, which is important for the proper functioning of the receptors in the retina (the eye's film layer).
People who are deficient in vitamin a can develop night blindness, but it rarely occurs in developed countries. In fact, we usually ingest enough vitamin a from meats and vegetbles in our regular diet that it often does not need to be supplemented.
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Thank
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