Does smoking increase the risk of lung cancer?

Yes! While cancer can occur in the lungs of non-smokers (specifically, pulmonary adenocarcinoma or metastatic carcinoma from another primary site), it is difficult to dispute the data that show lung cancer is more common in smokers than non-smokers.
Yes. Yes. Smoking is one of the most studied and most highly associated carcinogens when it comes to lung cancer.
Yes. 80% of lung cancer is caused by smoking (>100 cigarettes in one's history). Quitting smoking reduces the risk if lung cancer.

Related Questions

Can smoking give you lung cancer or just increase the chances of getting it?

Causative factor. Smoking, and some other carcinogens cause your own cells to be irritated, transform, then become malignant , and then grow a mass and then can metastasize in the process of cancer. Read more...
Increases risk. Only about 20% of lifelong smokers will develop lung cancer, so it doesn't cause cancer in everyone. Tobacco smoke interacts with genetic predisposition to lead to cancer. Read more...

I ran past someone smoking and inhaled a lot of smoke does this put me at greater risk of lung cancer?

No. A single exposure to second hand smoke will not alter your risk for lung or any other cancer. Keep up the exercise. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex. Read more...

I am wondering what causes lung cancer besides smoking?

Multiple. Radon gas, industrial air pollution, asbestos, genetics, etc. Given enough time, studies will likely show that anything can cause cancer, given a larger enough concentration, exposure, and time. Read more...

How to tell if I have lung cancer after only smoking 2 years?

No test. Lung cancer generally develops over numerous years. Having smoked does increase risk over longterm. It is unlikely for you to develop lung cancer in short term. Stopping, and stopping young will allow your increased risk for both lung and other diseases to decrease. http://goo.gl/q3itr. Read more...

I was wondering what are the lead causes of lung cancer besides smoking?

All are minor. Asbestos in the workplace is by far the most important. Despite all the talk about urban smoke / pollution, lung cancer was rare until cigs were introduced despite the cities being horribly smoky. Radon in the home has minimal impact on non-smokers. Uranium miners got lots of lung cancer but almost all were smokers. I suspect hexavalent chromium in industry is a risk. Read more...
Inhaling smoke. Tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produced by combustion of tar or any other organic chemical is known to be carcinogenic. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, benzpyrenes, to include some. Other chemicals may not be carcinogenic by themselves but act as co carcinogens when combined with cigarette smoke, like asbestos particles. High levels of radon gas increases risk of lung cancer. Radiation overd. Read more...

Help please? I want to know what are the lead causes of lung cancer besides smoking?

Radon exposure. Second hand smoke increases risk of lung cancer, as does exposure to radon, which is why radon testing in the home has become so prevalent. Asbestos is known to cause a rare cancer called mesothelioma. The risk of getting the typical type of lung cancer among people exposed to asbestos is much higher if they are also smokers. Read more...