How do doctors diagnose pregnancy-induced hypertension?

High blood pressure. A blood pressure over 140/90 with or without edema, excessive sudden weight gain, lab abnormalities, headache not relieved by tylenol, (acetaminophen) upper abdominal pain, vision disturbances, seizure or stroke. The most important sign is elevated blood pressure.
By monitoring BP. Pih is so common it is part of the routine screening of all ob's. The BP is taken & urine is screened for any evidence of the disorder. If hypertension begins to show, it is treated. However, some cased come on suddenly on or near time for delivery & some require extraordinary measured for control, up to and including premature delivery to save mom's life.

Related Questions

Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause hellp syndrome?

No. Pih includes both gestational hypertension, which is a benign condition where the woman's blood pressure increases slightly without the associated proteinuria, edema or lab abnormalities found in pre-eclampsia. Hellp syndrome is a variant of severe pre-eclampsia characterized by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low-platelets. Blood pressure may be high as well.
We don't think so. Generally speaking, our best understanding of this process is an activation of the coagulation cascade, not hypertension. Research into this condition continues, and our explanations will get better as the science evolves.

How does a biophysical profile help pregnancy-induced hypertension?

It doesn't. A biophysical profile (bpp) is not performed to help gestational hypertensive disorders, but to assess fetal well being. The bpp is an evaluation for signs of uteroplacental insufficiency, a complication of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. If there are signs of deterioration in the fetal status, early delivery may be indicated.
Doesn't help. A biophysical profile tests how the preeclampsia is affecting the fetus (a test of fetal well being).

Can pregnancy-induced hypertension have a negative effects on my baby?

Yes. Depending on the severity it can lead to stunted growth, medically induced prematurity, etc.
Maybe. Preeclampsia is harmful to you and your baby and should be treated (and you should be delivered as soon as is safe). Once the baby is delivered, medications should be chosen that won't cross into the milk, if you are breast feeding.

What is pregnancy-induced hypertension?

High Blood Pressure. There are four types of high blood pressure (hypertension) that can occur in pregnancy: preeclampsia, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension and gestational hypertension. Please see this link for complete info: http://bit. Ly/extems.
Isolated. Elevated bps without protein in the urine or other signs of preeclampsia.

What are the causes of pregnancy-induced hypertension?

PIH. There are four types of high blood pressure (hypertension) that can occur in pregnancy: preeclampsia, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension and gestational hypertension. Please see this link for complete info: http://bit. Ly/extems.
Chronic/preeclampsia. Hypertension occurs in 3-4% pregnancies. Most times it is a reflection of essential HTN (perhaps exacerbated by wt gain and increased plasma volume). Htn occurring after 20 weeks might reflect preeclampsia and if associated neurological changes, eclampsia. Thyroid abnormalities later in pregnancy can also affect BP and cause htn.

Should I be concerned about pregnancy-induced hypertension?

Yes. In the sense that it is an issue that needs to be managed during pregnancy. Usually pregnancy induced hypertension is either preeclampsia or not. If it is preeclampsia, then you need to determine if it is mild or severe. If it is gestational hypertension then as long as your blood pressure is controlled and the baby's growth is ok, then you can deliver at 39 to 40 weeks.
Yes. This process can cause harm to the baby and kill the mother. It is something that should be closely managed with meds and followup.