What happens during upper GI endoscopy? Will it hurt?

EGD. During upper endoscopy a flexible tube with a camera is passed to examine the esophagus and stomach. This is done under sedation. Usually there is no pain unless there are any complications.

Related Questions

Gastroenterologist found a reddish patch during upper GI endoscopy. I asked him if it looked concerning, and he said it looked like gastritis. He sent the sample for biopsy anyway. Based on this, how likely is it that patch was concerning?

Likely excess acid. gastritis means inflammation of the stomach lining, usually because of acid excess in the stomach or infection with a kind of bacteria that can survive in the acid of the stomach, or other rare causes. there is no reason for concerns at this stage as you had the biopsy taken and you have already seen a gastroenterologist. I suggest to follow the diet and medications prescribed. Read more...
Very subjective. Andrew, your question is very subjective. Depending on the gastroenterologist's experience, there is a good chance what he thought might be true. This likely means that he did not see any mass/necrosis/nasty looking ulcer to suggest malignancy. Despite that, he did send it for biopsy, so I would wait for the result. Read more...
Gastritis. Gastritis is an inflammatory process affecting the lining of the stomach and it is quite likely that you had a mild form of it. In my experience the endoscopist has a good idea if a lesion is very suspicious by visualizing it but just to be sure, biopsy is taken. It is reassuring that he stated the area looked like gastritis and not malignant appearing. I expect a favorable report for you. Read more...

What happens during an upper GI endoscopy?

Camera looks down. An endoscope is essentially a rubber tube with a video camera at the end of it. Usually, a patient receives some sedation and the camera is inserted down the throat thru the esophagus and into the stomach and often past the stomach into the duodenum. The endoscope transmits images to a video screen which the doctor can look at to detect ulcers. Read more...

I heard that people usually get local anesthetic during an upper GI endoscopy. My sister is 15 and got a general anesthesia. Why?

It depends . This is really more about what they were doing and what her condition is. Most upper endos are done with conscious sedation, some with deep sedation (with anesthesia), and some are done with general if more therapeutic maneuvers may be involved. Read more...
Some sedation. Most people actually get some form of sedation for an endoscopy. The type used actually does induce light sleep so that the patient is not troubled by the endoscope. This is why some people feel that they had a general anesthetic. If you sister was not willing to have an iv, the anesthesiologist may have had to give her a mask anesthetic to get an IV in. Read more...

Sister is 15. She got general anesthesia instead of local anesthetic during an upper GI endoscopy. It was 9 am and she got it through gas and iv. Why?

Comfort & safety. Some are unable to be adequately sedated f. Read more...
Sedation. Most if not all patients require some sedation for endoscopies. Usually this is accomplished by medication through an iv. Some patients, usually children, do not want an IV while they are awake, so an anesthesiologist can use gas to sedate the patient and then place an iv. The rest of the sedation will be done via the iv. Local anesthetic alone is not usually effective. Read more...
Her age. For an endoscopy, a patient needs to be very still and not move. Most times this can be done with sedation given through an iv. If this cannot be done, than a general anesthesia is required. An endoscopy is never performed under just local anesthesia. Read more...

What is an upper GI endoscopy?

Telescopic exam. Of the upper gastroenterologic (GI) tract. To examine esophagus, stomach and possible duodenum (firtst part of the intestine. Performed under conscious sedation or anestheia. To rule in or out an ulcer, cancer or various inflammatory conditions of the upper GI tract. Read more...
EGD. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (egd) is a test to examine the lining of the esophagus (the tube that connects your throat to your stomach), stomach, and first part of the small intestine. It is done with a small camera (flexible endoscope) that is inserted down the throat. Read more at www.Browardgi.Com. Read more...

I want to know why I can't eat after an upper GI endoscopy?

Mucosal abrasions. Any scoping procedure may cause micro-trauma to the mucosa which is harmless, but you do not want to eat right after the test because the food can cause additional irritation to the intestinal wall. Read more...
Endoscopy. Patients are not allowed to eat immediately after an endoscopy because their throat has been numbed with anesthetic which would make swallowing potentially dangerous. That wears off quickly though, and then they can eat, as long as there are no other tests planned and physician thinks it is the right thing to do. Hope that helps. Read more...