13 doctors weighed in:

What are the differences between depression and ptsd?

13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Missid Ghanem
Clinical Psychology
6 doctors agree

In brief: See below...

Depression is a mood disorder whereas ptsd is an anxiety disorder.
The theme in depression is one of sadness; in ptsd, it's one of fear and nervousness. While a traumatic event may have happened in the life of a depressed person, the occurrence of a traumatic event is a requirement in the diagnosis of ptsd.

In brief: See below...

Depression is a mood disorder whereas ptsd is an anxiety disorder.
The theme in depression is one of sadness; in ptsd, it's one of fear and nervousness. While a traumatic event may have happened in the life of a depressed person, the occurrence of a traumatic event is a requirement in the diagnosis of ptsd.
Dr. Missid Ghanem
Dr. Missid Ghanem
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Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry
3 doctors agree

In brief: The interplay

This question was well answered by a panel of md's.
Where complex, severe ptsd is present, there is often an interplay with depression. The hypervigilence & autonomic arousal of ptsd can be constant. This eventually leads to burn out with no energy, no motivation, no social interactions & no hope. The individual moves back & forth between fight & flight to an exhausted, demoralized state.

In brief: The interplay

This question was well answered by a panel of md's.
Where complex, severe ptsd is present, there is often an interplay with depression. The hypervigilence & autonomic arousal of ptsd can be constant. This eventually leads to burn out with no energy, no motivation, no social interactions & no hope. The individual moves back & forth between fight & flight to an exhausted, demoralized state.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
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Dr. Robert Stewart
Clinical Psychology
3 doctors agree

In brief: PTSD always involves

A traumatic experience and three types of symptoms -- re-experiencing the trauma, avoidance and emotional numbing, and excessive arousal (feeling nervous, stressed, jumpy, etc.
). Depression is feeling down, pessimistic, unable to feel pleasure, loss of energy & interest in doing things, changes in sleep & appetite, difficulty concentrating, and being self-critical. You can have both at once.

In brief: PTSD always involves

A traumatic experience and three types of symptoms -- re-experiencing the trauma, avoidance and emotional numbing, and excessive arousal (feeling nervous, stressed, jumpy, etc.
). Depression is feeling down, pessimistic, unable to feel pleasure, loss of energy & interest in doing things, changes in sleep & appetite, difficulty concentrating, and being self-critical. You can have both at once.
Dr. Robert Stewart
Dr. Robert Stewart
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Dr. Susan Uhrich
Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: PTSD VS depression

Ptsd is an anxiety disorder which often has depression on top of it.
But ptsd is characterized by there having been a traumatic event which begins to pervade the persons life --- dreams, avoiding situations that remind them of the traumatic event, etc.

In brief: PTSD VS depression

Ptsd is an anxiety disorder which often has depression on top of it.
But ptsd is characterized by there having been a traumatic event which begins to pervade the persons life --- dreams, avoiding situations that remind them of the traumatic event, etc.
Dr. Susan Uhrich
Dr. Susan Uhrich
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Dr. Maritza Baez
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Good question

In ptsd, the person experienced something traumatic and constantly relives it, tries to avoid things that remind him of it, & is always "on alert.
" this has to go on for at least a month. All of this causes distress or impairment in the person's life and/or relationships. In depression, the person is sad and/or irritable (to a greater extreme than is normal) and may not know why.

In brief: Good question

In ptsd, the person experienced something traumatic and constantly relives it, tries to avoid things that remind him of it, & is always "on alert.
" this has to go on for at least a month. All of this causes distress or impairment in the person's life and/or relationships. In depression, the person is sad and/or irritable (to a greater extreme than is normal) and may not know why.
Dr. Maritza Baez
Dr. Maritza Baez
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