12 doctors weighed in:
What beds are good to prevent bedsores?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Erik Borncamp
Wound care
7 doctors agree
In brief: Depends.
There are a wide range of hospital mattresses.
The basic ones do little to prevent. Then there are the air mattresses where the pt is sleeping on a cushion of air. This works much better. Really the best help is frequent changing of position to prevent prolonged pressure on one spot for more than 1. - -2 hours

In brief: Depends.
There are a wide range of hospital mattresses.
The basic ones do little to prevent. Then there are the air mattresses where the pt is sleeping on a cushion of air. This works much better. Really the best help is frequent changing of position to prevent prolonged pressure on one spot for more than 1. - -2 hours
Dr. Erik Borncamp
Dr. Erik Borncamp
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Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Mattress Surfaces
It is not the bed but the mattress or surface that is important.
There are many choices. Remember that any surface other than a standard mattress will provide improved prevention. Also remember that there are no quality studies showing one surface is any better than any other surface in the prevention of bedsores. Any prolonged body dependency on any mattress can result in pressure injury.

In brief: Mattress Surfaces
It is not the bed but the mattress or surface that is important.
There are many choices. Remember that any surface other than a standard mattress will provide improved prevention. Also remember that there are no quality studies showing one surface is any better than any other surface in the prevention of bedsores. Any prolonged body dependency on any mattress can result in pressure injury.
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
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1 comment
Dr. Edward Nieshoff
A low air loss mattress is the standard of care for treating serious pressure ulcerations. They are expensive to rent or buy. A foam overlay is often used instead, if the wound is minor. Even so, COMPLETE removal of pressure is best, eg, turn side to side for a sacral ulceration. Changing position at least every 2 hours is a good rule of thumb.
Dr. Eddie Nakhuda
Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
In brief: None
Many pressure beds have come & gone.
Some are still used for treating pressure sores but as far as prevention a regular 2 hrs turning schedule along with good nutrition, hydration & skin care tops them all.

In brief: None
Many pressure beds have come & gone.
Some are still used for treating pressure sores but as far as prevention a regular 2 hrs turning schedule along with good nutrition, hydration & skin care tops them all.
Dr. Eddie Nakhuda
Dr. Eddie Nakhuda
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