Does a high white blood cell count mean I have cancer?

Not necessarily. Many conditions such as infection, inflammatory process, infarction can increase white blood cells count. This is a normal body response. However, if white blood cell counts persistently elevated in the absence of infection/inflammation &/or if it is associated with abnormality on the other blood counts-red blood and platelets -further evaluations including bone marrow biopsy is likely needed.
Not necessarily. While high WBC count is associated with leukemia infections are more commonly associated with high WBC count.
Not necessarily. White blood counts can be elevated as a result of an infection or inflammatory process. When this happens it is called a leukemoid reaction and is a normal physiologic response.

Related Questions

I wondering, but why is a high white blood cell count consistent with cancer?

Says who? Tasking a cold shower can give you a high white count. If you feel well, the cells are all normal, and the elevation is mild, no further work up is indicated. . Read more...

Can you please explain why a high white blood cell count is consistent with cancer?

Not always. Elevated white blood cell counts are more commonly associated with infections. However, if the number is remaining high, extremely high, or increasing over time, this may be a finding consistent with cancer. Read more...
Could be high. Could be low. Many other tests should be done to confirm cancer. Read more...

Can viral infections be diagnosed by a high white blood cell count assuming blood cancers are not a factor?

Need a work up. Not enough information. There are many viruses that cause human disease and investigators keep finding new ones. A high white count may occur as a result of multiple causes. Thus , one needs to have this looked at with a careful history, physical exam and guided diagnostic work up. Sometimes finding the answer can be slow. Read more...
Yes. Viral infections can cause relatively high white cells, mostly lymphocytes. Look at the whole blood counts, white, red cells, size and shape. And platelets. Any nodes, fever, sweats, weight change, bleeding, sore throat....? Do not put your self in a corner. Think outside the box. Discuss with your md. Read more...

Could periodontitis cause high white blood cell count, elevated platelet count, and low neutrophils. Any causes besides cancer can cause this.

MD and DMD/DDS. You will need dental care to help you resolve your periodontitis. You also need a medical consult to help you interpret your blood tests. Many conditions can influence these parameters and you need expertise from both a medical and dental professional to get a proper diagnosis and treatment. High WBC indicates a possible bacterial infection that may or may not be caused by your gums. See both! Read more...
2 separate problems. Periodontitis and gingivitis frequently are seen in patients with neutropenia. 1. See your PCP first for consultation, tests and treatment. 2. See your dentist for periodontal evaluation and treatment, according to PCP recommendations. Read more...

My husband has colon cancer, his tumor and section of colon were removed yesterday. He has an elevated white blood cell count but no fever. Problem?

See below. All laboratory results need to be interpreted in the clinical context and the doctor who ordered the tests is usually in the best position to do that. Having said that, the elevated white cell count is likely a normal reaction to the trauma of surgery. If he has fever, discharge from the surgical site, pain at the surgical site, then you should consult your doctor promptly. Read more...