10 doctors weighed in:
Does having a high white blood cell count indicate leukemia?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Richard Mcgee
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Not necessarily
There are many possible causes of a high white blood cell count including infection, allergic reactions, medication effects, other types of "inflammation", and also leukemias.

In brief: Not necessarily
There are many possible causes of a high white blood cell count including infection, allergic reactions, medication effects, other types of "inflammation", and also leukemias.
Dr. Richard Mcgee
Dr. Richard Mcgee
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Dr. Guido Tricot
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Not necessarily
It should always be of concern and should lead to a more complete blood work, especially to see what your red blood cell count and platelet count is.
If those are normal, it is unlikely leukemia. The WBC count should be rechecked two weeks later. If red blood cells or platelets are clearly abnormal, you should see a doctor immediately.

In brief: Not necessarily
It should always be of concern and should lead to a more complete blood work, especially to see what your red blood cell count and platelet count is.
If those are normal, it is unlikely leukemia. The WBC count should be rechecked two weeks later. If red blood cells or platelets are clearly abnormal, you should see a doctor immediately.
Dr. Guido Tricot
Dr. Guido Tricot
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Dr. Ashok Patel
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
In brief: Not necessarily
While leukemia can be associated with high white cell count, infections are more commonly associated with high white cell count.

In brief: Not necessarily
While leukemia can be associated with high white cell count, infections are more commonly associated with high white cell count.
Dr. Ashok Patel
Dr. Ashok Patel
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Dr. Edward Gold
Internal Medicine
In brief: Not necessarily
White blood counts can be elevated as a result of an infection or inflammatory process.
When this happens it is called a leukemoid reaction and is a normal physiologic response.

In brief: Not necessarily
White blood counts can be elevated as a result of an infection or inflammatory process.
When this happens it is called a leukemoid reaction and is a normal physiologic response.
Dr. Edward Gold
Dr. Edward Gold
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