5 doctors weighed in:
Do allergies cause an elevated white blood count?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Possibly
The total WBC count may be increased but the differential of the count may be more telling.
Often, the eosinophils, basophils, or mast cells (or combo of any) may be higher than normal.

In brief: Possibly
The total WBC count may be increased but the differential of the count may be more telling.
Often, the eosinophils, basophils, or mast cells (or combo of any) may be higher than normal.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
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Dr. Gary Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
In brief: Generally not
The most prevalent white blood cell, the neutrophil, accounts for 50-70% of the white blood cell count, and isn't affected by allergies.
Eosinophils, however, can be increased in severe allergies, but only account for 3-5% of white blood cells. This is generally not enough to affect the overall white blood cell count.

In brief: Generally not
The most prevalent white blood cell, the neutrophil, accounts for 50-70% of the white blood cell count, and isn't affected by allergies.
Eosinophils, however, can be increased in severe allergies, but only account for 3-5% of white blood cells. This is generally not enough to affect the overall white blood cell count.
Dr. Gary Steven
Dr. Gary Steven
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