12 doctors weighed in:

How is cancer treated in pregnancy?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Kramer
Gynecology
5 doctors agree

In brief: Usually the same

During pregnancy the immune system is suppressed (this allows the body not to reject the developing baby as foreign).
It also can make cancer grow faster. Some cancer treatments are altered to accommodate the developing baby and others are not so not to compromise the mother's health.

In brief: Usually the same

During pregnancy the immune system is suppressed (this allows the body not to reject the developing baby as foreign).
It also can make cancer grow faster. Some cancer treatments are altered to accommodate the developing baby and others are not so not to compromise the mother's health.
Dr. Scott Kramer
Dr. Scott Kramer
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Lester Thompson
This is very dependent on the cancer type. In many cases there is no change whatsoever (surgery is still surgery). But, in others, especially if there is chemotherapy or radiation therapy, these treatments will be delayed or altered significantly to prevent teratogenesis (defects in the forming fetus).
Dr. Sabha Ganai
Surgery - Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Carefully

Usually there are no major changes to surgical management, although consulting with your obstetrician and fetal monitoring are key.
There are some chemotherapeutic drugs that are avoided but most can be safely administered depending on the trimester. Radiation therapy is often delayed.

In brief: Carefully

Usually there are no major changes to surgical management, although consulting with your obstetrician and fetal monitoring are key.
There are some chemotherapeutic drugs that are avoided but most can be safely administered depending on the trimester. Radiation therapy is often delayed.
Dr. Sabha Ganai
Dr. Sabha Ganai
Thank
Dr. Christian Schultheis
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology

In brief: Combined approach

A combined approach with an oncologist and gynecologist.
Chemotherapy can be used but usually reserved until the 2nd or 3rd trimester. Most oncologists should have some experience with this situation but should be taken care of at a tertiary care center or in collaboration with multiple physicians. Also should be taken care of by someone who has experience in this situation. Hope this helps.

In brief: Combined approach

A combined approach with an oncologist and gynecologist.
Chemotherapy can be used but usually reserved until the 2nd or 3rd trimester. Most oncologists should have some experience with this situation but should be taken care of at a tertiary care center or in collaboration with multiple physicians. Also should be taken care of by someone who has experience in this situation. Hope this helps.
Dr. Christian Schultheis
Dr. Christian Schultheis
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Marsha Davis
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
24 years in practice
67M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors