4 doctors weighed in:
Why are heroin users at a higher risk for contracting hiv/aids and hepatitis b and c?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: Contaminated needles
Years ago they found a case of hepb in a worker who got stuck by a needle cleaning out a crack house that had been abandoned for a year. All the mentioned illnesses are passed readily thru contaminated needles.
The blood tainting the needle itself, hub or syringe can spread the disease to any subsequent user.

In brief: Contaminated needles
Years ago they found a case of hepb in a worker who got stuck by a needle cleaning out a crack house that had been abandoned for a year. All the mentioned illnesses are passed readily thru contaminated needles.
The blood tainting the needle itself, hub or syringe can spread the disease to any subsequent user.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Addiction Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Intravenous use
The most common way heroin is abused is by injecting it into a vein.
The user takes unsterile drug, puts it into unsterile water (or even spit or urine) and then uses a syringe and needle (as well as the "cooker") that has often been used by others. If the germs for HIV or hepatatits b/c are present anywhere along the line, infection is likely to happen. Same is true of cocaine, amphetamine etc.

In brief: Intravenous use
The most common way heroin is abused is by injecting it into a vein.
The user takes unsterile drug, puts it into unsterile water (or even spit or urine) and then uses a syringe and needle (as well as the "cooker") that has often been used by others. If the germs for HIV or hepatatits b/c are present anywhere along the line, infection is likely to happen. Same is true of cocaine, amphetamine etc.
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Thank
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