What is the definition or description of: neonatal?

Terminology issues. The term neonatal is generally used to describe events that occur with an infant within the first 30 days after birth.Some practitioners are looser with the definition & extend the interval to 60 days.

Related Questions

What is the definition or description of: neonatal herpes?

See below. Neonatal herpes simplex is a herpes simplex infection that occurs in newborns and is usually passed along from the mother during delivery of the baby. It can be a life-threatening condition, and may affect the infant's brain, spinal cord and internal organs. Read more...
Herpes in a newborn. Neonatal herpes is serious viral infection of a newborn caused by the herpes virus. Both type 1 (the "cold sore virus") and type 2 (the herpes virus usually associated with genital herpes infection) can cause the disease, though infections with type 2 herpes virus are associated with more severe disease. Herpesvirus can cause severe damage to the brain/central nervous system. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Neonatal seizures?

Neonatal seizures. Seizures or convulsions that occurs in infants under one month of age. The most common cause of neonatal seizures is hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy or HIE. HIE is a brain injury that occurs with a lack of oxygen. Neonatal seizures can be focal, limited to one part of the body, or generalized, occur on entire body. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: neonatal lupus?

Baby Lupus. Neonatal lupus erythematosus presents in infants, most often girls, born to mothers who carry the ro/ssa antibody. Neonatal lupus can cause a decrease in red cells (anemia), white blood cells and platelets, and a skin rash. Problems can also develop in the electrical system of the baby's heart (congenital heart block). A pacemaker for the baby's heart may be needed in this setting. Read more...
Autoimmune disease. Neonatal lupus is a passively transferred autoimmune disease. It occurs in ~1-2% of babies born to mothers with autoimmune disease, primarily systemic lupus erythematosus and sjögren’s syndrome, and antibodies to ssa/ro and/or ssb/la. Many cases occur in children of mothers who have the same autoantibodies, but who do not have symptoms of lupus or other autoimmune diseases. Read more...