Is it possible a collapsed lung will heal without a chest tube?

Only if very small. Only if very small, and does not get bigger with serial cxr. Air in the pleural space (pneumothorax) gets smaller by 1% every day if the lung is not actively leaking.
Yes. A collapsed lung is due to an air leak from the inside of the lung through the covering of the lung, out into the space between the lung and the ribs. The site of the leak has some damage, which will heal itself later. If only a very small amount of air leaked into the chest cavity, that air can go away without treatment. If a little more air leaked, a doctor can suck the air out with a catheter.
Yes. If the pneumothorax is small, it is possible to not need a chest tube. Using 100% oxygen will help absorb the air and potentially keep someone from need a chest tube.
Possibly. The treatment for collapsed lung (pneumothorax) can range for simple observation to surgical treatment. The type of treatment used is determined by a number of factors: size of pneumothorax, likelihood of resolution, likelihood of recurrence, cause and symptoms, A small assymptomatic pneumothorax may be observed. A tension pneumothorax can be life threatening and requires immediate treatment.
In some cases, yes. A small pneumothorax will resolve without any treatment. It's a judgment call for the physician to decide (depending on the circumstances) when a pneumothorax is large enough to warrant the placement of a chest tube. Factors to consider include: size of the pneumothorax, the cause, the severity of symptoms, and other medical conditions.

Related Questions

Can you restore a collapsed lung without a chest tube?

Only small ones. Collapsed lungs ("pneumothorax") are very common after trauma and make occur spontaneously, often due to small blebs on the lung. In the era of ct scans, we find many, many pneumothoraces that would have been way too small to be seen on traditional chest x-ray. If it is small (~15-20%) and not associated with shortness of breath, a repeat x-ray will show resolution w/o rx most of the time. Read more...

I had a collapsed lung a week ago what is that redish liquid coming out of the chest tube.

Chest tube. This is normal and is draining what is around the lung to prevent it from collapsing. Good luck! not fun to have a chest tube! get better soon! Read more...
Normal. The body normally makes significant pleural fluid each day. It is produced on the parietal pleura (chestwall) side and absorbed or drains through the visceral pleura (lung lining) into the lymph vessels of the lung. The chest tube drains some of this fluid before it is absorbed. It can be mildly blood tinged so it can be kool-aid colored. http://goo.gl/myn9nj. Read more...

I had a collapsed lung and I have a chest tube on me right now. I'm wondering if it's normal if the tube is filled with a redish liquid?

Not unusual. It is not unusual to have some blood in the chest tube. Frequently, particularly in the case of trauma, there is a hemo-pneumothorax. That is, there is blood also in the space between the lung and the pleural space. This is effectively drained by the chest tube. Read more...
Discuss w your doc. It would be expected to have a little blood in the pleural fluid right after the chest tube is placed. Depending on the causes of how your lung is collapsed, a little blood that makes the fluid look reddish can be expected or it is a cause for concern. Best way is to discuss it with your attending physician or your floor nurse. Hope you have a quick recovery. Read more...
Why put in? The answer somewhat depends on the cause of the collapsed lung and the method the tube was inserted, how long ago, and if the red color is getting better or worse. Read more...

I had a collapsed lung a week ago. I have a chest tube that is leaking a reddish liquid. What is it and is it normal?

Chest Tubes. Yes. That is their function. They keep the area pressurized and let any inflammatory fluid, like blood tinged body fluids, drain easily so that other complications do not develop. I would hope that your physician gave you some literature or other instructions on what to watch for. Read more...
Likely. Sounds like ur home and the leakage is around the tube site? In either case, some leakage is normal. Redness around the catheter site, increasing pain, shortness or breath, fever/chills are not normal and u need to call ur doc. Read more...

I am having 3 rib cartilages removed due to slipping rib syndrome. What should expect during and after surgery? Chest tube? Collapsed lung?

Possible . May enter pleura in process. Small tube during closure then removal or next day removal if no lung damage- leak. Read more...
Rarely. All those complications are possible, but are extremely rare. If you need a chest tube it will be small tube and it will be out next day.Nothing to worry. Read more...

Collapsed lunghad markers placed in liver 3 weeks ago had collapsed lung, treatment chest tube, could it reoccur?

May be. Depends on cause. If the cause was direct puncture of lung during procedure, then it will not happen again. If it was, say a bleb, it could happen again. Read more...
Unlikely. If due to the test and needles , it is unlikely to recur. Spontaneous pneumo does have a significant spontaneous recurrence rate. Read more...

How can a pneumothorax occur at the apex of the lung after wedge resection? Chest tube still in place since 1/15/15.

Not healed. The pneumothorax refers to air within your pulmonary cavity, external to your lung. This occurs during surgery when the pulmonary cavity was opened up to resect a part of your lung. The chest tube under suction is an attempt to drain this air and fluid until everything is healed. It just suggests things are not completely healed yet. At some point, there are other options for intervention . Read more...

I had a spontaneous full lung collapse 5months ago. I'm having sharp pain exactly where the chest tube was and shoots up my shoulder. Should I go 2 er?

Depends. Unless you have something urgent like a high fever or a red +/- draining wound or trouble breathing, i don't think the er is necessary. Instead, you should make an appointment to see the doctor who treated you for the lung collapse. Good luck! Read more...