How can I help my husband cope with my postpartum depression?

Educate him. Spouses and family members can do a lot to help by providing emotional support to the mother with ppd. However in order to do that, they need to be educated about the illness. I would suggest you get books or articles that he can read or better yet, take him to your therapist with you. Sometimes husbands are having their own difficulties coping, and may need to get treatment too.
Talk to him. Talk to him about your feelings. Make sure he understands that your feelings and behaviors are related to hormone changes and are not fully in your control. Be a partner with him in seeking help. Be sure he accompanies you to your doctor's appointments and communicates with the doctor about what he is observing. And you should both understand that it won't last forever.
Get him help too. If talking to him and involving him in the care of the baby is not enough, encourage him to seek counseling to help him cope with your depression. Also make sure that he gets more involved with the baby if you feel that you can't.

Related Questions

How can I cope with my daughter's postpartum depression?

Support/ help. Be supportive, get her help if needed (if her functioning and care for the baby are impaired). Offer help with the baby, but don't forget to take care of self. Take breaks when you need them. It will be easy for you to get caught up in the emotion; therefore, it's important to do lots of self-care. Read more...
Educate him. Spouses and family members can do a lot to help by providing emotional support to the mother with ppd. However in order to do that, they need to be educated about the illness. I would suggest you get books or articles that you can read to understand ways to help. Sometimes families are having their own difficulties coping, and may need to get support or treatment too. Read more...
Consult her treaters. Your daughter should be seeing a psychiatrist. With her permission ask to speak to her treaters to get advice. Be as helpful with childcare and reducing pressure on her. Read more...

What percent of women suffer form postpartum depression?

11-42% This is very common, with as many as 42% of moms experiencing ppd. The risk is higher if there is a personal or family history of ppd, depression, or anxiety. Read more...
Onset of PPD.. Postpartum depression can present anytime in the first year. It is most common to begin within the first 3 to 4 months. However it can begin later in the first year, particularly with changes like abruptly stopping nursing, beginning of birth control pills, etc. If you suspect you may have ppd, contact your dr. And seek help from a mental health specialist with expertise in treating it. Read more...

Does postpartum depression more often affect those who already suffer from it?

Yes. Post-partum depression is at high risk for someone who has hx of depressive disorder or previous post patum depression. Read more...
Yes. If you have had postpartum depression before, your risk of a re-occurence increases with subsequent pregnancies. If you have had or currently experience depression, you are higher risk during the postpartum period than a woman who has no history of depression. Read more...

How to help my wife with postpartum depression?

Find a therapist. In addition to being supportive and listening to your wife, it is important to get her help from a professional. Postpartum depression can last for years if left untreated and can become quite severe. Find a therapist that is experienced or ask your or her doctor for a referral. Read more...

How does postpartum depression affect my family?

Adds More Stress. Any illness puts a stress on a family balance. Having a baby puts a stress on a family as well (even if it's a positive stress). Every family deals differently with stress and any particular action by the family will be dependent on how family deals with stress during "bad" times. If you feel, you have post-partum depression, get evaluated, get treatment for your sake and sake of your child. Read more...
Multiple ways. Subtle interractions between yourself and the baby can be affected. A babies brain is 400 gms at birth and 800 grams at 2 Y.O. A lot is happenning that affects basic programming and had been termed maternal looping.Otherwise, we probably don't have to tell you the effects; increased stress changes the dynamics and it depends on the family, get help. Read more...

How do I know if I am at risk for postpartum depression?

Risk factors. Some risk factors would be history of depression in the past. Not having a supportive partner or family. Read more...
Any postpartum woman. Is potentially at risk. Personally if there is any history of depression in the family or postpartum woman there is a significant risk of postpartum depression. Obviously any previous postpartum depression us the strongest predictor of all for getting the disorder. Because of the possibility of severe, even fatal consequences of postpartum depression get treatment immediately when signs occur. Read more...
Know risk factors. Several risk factors can predispose women to ppd, including: *previous history of postpartum depression *symptoms of depression or severe anxiety during pregnancy *prior history of depression *significant pms or pmdd *lack of social support network *relationship problems *major psychosocial stressors *fertility issues may increase risk *history of physical and/or sexual abuse. Read more...

What should I do for my friend with postpartum depression?

Support her. Support your friend by being present and willing to hear her feelings. Help with the infant, if appropriate. Encourage & help your friend to get professional care for her depression. Medicines (some are safe in breastfeeding) and talk therapy may help her. Help her reach out to others, like extended family who may not know what she needs. For education: http://tinyurl.Com/7onlu98. Read more...

Can postpartum depression cause women to feel changing emotions?

Yes. Post partum depression is often accompanied by anxiety. Anxiety over germ phobia, responsibilities of becoming a parent worrying about the child's health.Paranoid thoughts and delusions occur infrequently and require urgent care. Read more...
Yes, Emotions can fluctuate strongly in the post-partum period, thought due to rapidly changing hormone levels. In a significant number of women, a persistent depressed mood can set it, interfering with the natural joy and bonding of this time. When mood fluctuations turn into depression, treatment is essential. Read more...

Could I be suffering from postpartum depression? How can I tell?

Not the baby blues. Postpartum depression develops 1 - 6 months after the birth of your baby. Symptoms last at least 2 weeks that include feeling depressed with at least 4 of the following: poor sleep, low energy, poor concentration, changes in appetite, feelings of excessive guilt, lack of enjoyment, moving slower of faster than normal, or suicidal thoughts. If you have any of these, seek professional assistance. Read more...
Seek help? Resent birth, overwhelmed, difficulties bonding with your baby, mood swings, crying spells. However, only a specialist can diagnose the condition.Find a provider who specializes in post-partum depression. Even if you don't have a diagnosis, the meetings might help you figure out how to cope with the situation better benefiting you, your baby and your family. Read more...