Is alcoholism associated with being abused as a child?

Yes. An alcoholic parent will be more likely to abuse a child than a sober one. Being abused, as a child, increases the risk for many problems down the road, including anxiety disorders, mood disorders and substance abuse. The cycle of substance abuse and child abuse are often long standing, multi-generational family problems. Such patterns are often difficult to break.
No. Alcoholism is a disease. While there are many environmental factors that may exacerbate this condition, childhood abuse is no more, or no less, important.

Related Questions

Is alcoholism related to child abuse?

Not necessarily. Alcoholism and child abuse co-exist in some families. Alcoholism can make parents neglect their children's needs, or abuse them emotionally, physically, and sometimes sexually. In some families, domestic violence can also accompany alcoholism. The children may learn how to treat the opposite sex from such unhealthy examples. Child abuse may, but does not automatically, lead to alcohol abuse. Read more...
Abuse increases risk. Not everyone who has a history of abuse will become addicted. However, a history of child abuse or childhood trauma can increase the risk of later alcoholism/addiction. The vast majority of patients in treatment for addiction have a history of past abuse or trauma. Childhood trauma apparently "primes the brain" to become addicted. Read more...
Yes. Number of studies have established that alcohol is significant contributory factor to child maltreatment, and many show that being maltreated as a child is associated with marked increases in risk of hazardous or harmful drinking in later life. Read more...