8 doctors weighed in:

Does hypnotherapy work on children with bed wetting?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. George Klauber
Pediatrics - Urology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Sometimes

Better to try simple measures first, ie restricting fluids, lifting to toilet at night, bedwetting alarm or medication.

In brief: Sometimes

Better to try simple measures first, ie restricting fluids, lifting to toilet at night, bedwetting alarm or medication.
Dr. George Klauber
Dr. George Klauber
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1 comment
Dr. Moez Khorsandi
Has never been studied nor proven to work in children.
Dr. Louis Grenzer
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Actually, I do not have experience with this in children but was very successful in treating an adult patient with bed wetting.
Once again, the hypnosis is a tool and one has to decide how to approach the problem using that tool. The fact that one has not done a scientific study, does not necessarily mean that the treatment does not work.

In brief: Yes

Actually, I do not have experience with this in children but was very successful in treating an adult patient with bed wetting.
Once again, the hypnosis is a tool and one has to decide how to approach the problem using that tool. The fact that one has not done a scientific study, does not necessarily mean that the treatment does not work.
Dr. Louis Grenzer
Dr. Louis Grenzer
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Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Absolutely

I've worked with many children suffering from difficulty with dry beds by using hypnosis.
The child can typically achieve dryness after only a few sessions unless there is some underlying medical problem or a pyschologic need to have a wet bed.

In brief: Absolutely

I've worked with many children suffering from difficulty with dry beds by using hypnosis.
The child can typically achieve dryness after only a few sessions unless there is some underlying medical problem or a pyschologic need to have a wet bed.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Dr. Kevin Windisch
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3 comments
Dr. George Klauber
This is probably the most expensive treatment modality, requiring the most physician visits. This approach might be considered if and when a trial bedwetting alarm, including full parentenal involvement has been unsuccessful.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
bed wetting alarms aren't cheap and almost never work. They do a great job of humilitating the child, though.
Dr. Jay Park
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No convincing data

Bladder alarm has been the most effective treatment for night time bed wetting.

In brief: No convincing data

Bladder alarm has been the most effective treatment for night time bed wetting.
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Kevin Windisch
marshall marshall and richards pediatrics 52, 813-817 suggest that active patient involvement in therapy (such as in hypnosis) is the most effective therapeutic modality whereas conditioning devices such as alarms were one of the least effective
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