Can 'minimally invasive' heart surgery be performed on a child?

Yes, but depends. "minimally invasive" is a broad term. But many lesions can be done with "minimally invasive" techniques. And new techniques are being developed with catheters (which don't involve scalpels/surgery at all). The method of surgery often depends on the type of heart defect, so please discuss this with your child's cariologist.
Some. Some shunts and PDA closures are done with mics but all the major repairs require full sternotomy.

Related Questions

Has anyone done open heart surgery to repair a hole on a child with a patch?

Amplatz procedure. I believe you are speaking about the amplatz procedure to use a button type device to close an atrial septal defect. This procedure is used when the hole is not too large and is only in the upper chambers of the heart. It cannot be used to close a "hole" or defect in the ventricular septum or hole between the lower 2 chambers of the heart. Read more...

If someone has had open heart surgery as a child, would he usually have a shorter lifespan?

It depends. Some problems can be essentially cured with open heart surgery, with little effect on the lifespan or activity. Other serious problems result in a notably shorter life expectancy. Read more...
What surgery? It depends on what defect was treated. Some defects can be cured with surgery but others can only be palliated. Either way surveillance is important so follow up with the cardiologist is necessary. Some heart defect do lead to a shorter life span. Read more...

My husband was told he needs heart surgery for mitral valve regurgitation and his aorta valve. My husband has been told he needs heart surgery for valves in his heart. Should he get a 2nd opinion? Also I had rheumatic fever as a child. I was told about

Hi . Hi mary, thank you for your questions. First let's start with your husband. There are specific criteria for determining when a heart valve should be repaired or replaced. They are outlined in guidelines from the american heart association and american college of cardiology. Without knowing more specific details about his case, i can only make some general points. First, when there is excessive leaking from the mitral or aortic valves, this causes the heart to dilate and eventually weaken. Alternatively, when the aortic valve gets calcified, thick and narrowed this is called aortic stenosis. When this condition is severe, very high pressure builds up in the heart and the muscle thickens and eventually fails. If left untreated, any of these conditions can cause permanent and severe heart damage. Your husband may need one or both repaired or replaced. Double valve surgery is higher risk, but still feasible. There is no reason to get a second opinion if your doctor can clearly explain to you the criteria by which he needs both valves replaced. It is important to see a surgeon that you trust and who has good reported surgical outcomes. As far as your case, your rapid weight gain and symptoms of fatigue, breathlessness and chest pain are all symptoms of heart failure. If you have rheumatic heart disease, you may also have a bad valve as the cause for these symptoms. You should see a cardiologist and have a complete physical and an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound). If the problem is with your valve, it may be able to be repaired or perhaps replaced. Read more...
Mary, I . Mary, i agree with everything that dr. Moorman pointed out. I would add that generally speaking, if the recommendations made by his cardiologist are sound, and you and your husband would feel better by seeking a second opinion, then your cardiologist should support you. If they don't then i would be concerned that the recommendations being given are not based on as sound of decision making as you might otherwise be led to believe. Read more...
Possibly. If you have questions, ask your doctor. There is nothing wrong with getting another opinion. Read more...

What are the risks involved with minimally invasive heart surgery?

Similar to standard. For most minimally invasive heart surgery the main difference is the means to access the surgical site. Though less trauma may be needed, the actual surgical procedure itself will be similar and therefore have comparative risk to an "open" case. Read more...
Depends. What diagnosis what operation what personal risk factors? Death bleeding recurrence over time stroke infection are the serious but infrequent things we talk to patients about as they consent to operations. Read more...

Is minimally invasive heart surgery the same as open heart surgery?

Mostly.... The biggest difference is usually the incision size, with minimally invasive being smaller and often avoiding opening the breastbone. The actual surgical procedure, such as valve repair or bypass is often identical to the traditional approach. Read more...
No. Minimally invasive heart surgery are performed through small institutions on the sides of your chest. They will go through your rib cage inorder to not crack your chest. This results in quicker recovery time and less pain. Your surgeon could also see areas of the heart better rather than open heart. Read more...

I'm wondering why is heart surgery performed through the scrotum?

It's not. Heart surgery is performed through the chest. Some percutaneous treatments are performed through the femoral vessels in the groin. Read more...