5 doctors weighed in:
Can the left internal mammary artery side branches affect blood flow rate in humans?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Michael Fenster
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Depends
Coronary steal from unligated side branches from the left internal mammary artery (lima) when it is used for coronary bypass is an area of open debate.
Most surgeons will ligate a large side branch to prevent the possibility of steal, small branches are often not (the risk of ligating higher than the liklihood of steal). The exact size that requires ligation to prevent steal is unknown.

In brief: Depends
Coronary steal from unligated side branches from the left internal mammary artery (lima) when it is used for coronary bypass is an area of open debate.
Most surgeons will ligate a large side branch to prevent the possibility of steal, small branches are often not (the risk of ligating higher than the liklihood of steal). The exact size that requires ligation to prevent steal is unknown.
Dr. Michael Fenster
Dr. Michael Fenster
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Dr. Michael Moran
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes.
The lima is frequently used as a bypass conduit in coronary bypass surgery.
Large side branches left un-clipped can "steal" blood from going to the bypassed artery. If symptomatic, these side branches can be closed easily by "coil embolization" using the same minimally invasive technique as cardiac catheterization.

In brief: Yes.
The lima is frequently used as a bypass conduit in coronary bypass surgery.
Large side branches left un-clipped can "steal" blood from going to the bypassed artery. If symptomatic, these side branches can be closed easily by "coil embolization" using the same minimally invasive technique as cardiac catheterization.
Dr. Michael Moran
Dr. Michael Moran
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