3 doctors weighed in:
What is the significance of stenosis of the mitral valve?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. William Scott
Pediatrics - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: It varies
Mild stenosis may casue no problems.
Severe stenosis causes the pressure to increase in the left atrium, the lungs and eventually the right side of the heart. The left atrium enlarges in response to the higher pressure and the likelihood of atrial arrhythmias increases. Fluid can accumulate in the lungs causing shortness of breath and exercise intolerance.

In brief: It varies
Mild stenosis may casue no problems.
Severe stenosis causes the pressure to increase in the left atrium, the lungs and eventually the right side of the heart. The left atrium enlarges in response to the higher pressure and the likelihood of atrial arrhythmias increases. Fluid can accumulate in the lungs causing shortness of breath and exercise intolerance.
Dr. William Scott
Dr. William Scott
Thank
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
In brief: Mitral stenosis
Mitral stenosis is caused by rheumatic fever. If the valve becomes severely stenotic ("blocked"), blood doesn't flow into the left ventricle adequately.
This results in congestive heart failure and, if untreated, ultimatedly death. Mitral commissurotomy or replacement fixes the problem.

In brief: Mitral stenosis
Mitral stenosis is caused by rheumatic fever. If the valve becomes severely stenotic ("blocked"), blood doesn't flow into the left ventricle adequately.
This results in congestive heart failure and, if untreated, ultimatedly death. Mitral commissurotomy or replacement fixes the problem.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
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