What is the significance of hydro elastoma of the mitral valve?

Rupture? The hydro elastoma is a filament that is attached to the mitral valve and other structures of the left heart that has the potential to rupture and embolize, meaning that remnants and particles of it could move through the blood stream potentially block flow.
Fibroelastoma. A papillary fibroelastoma is a benign tumor of the heart valve that can cause chest pain, palpitations, heart attack, stroke, and death. Symptoms are usually due to mechanical obstruction of the valve by the tumor or by small portions breaking off and traveling to various parts of the body. Treatment is usually surgery to remove the tumor.

Related Questions

What is the significance of an obstructive lesion in the mitral valve?

Slow flow. Mitral stenosis, a narrowing of the mitral valve, stresses the heart making it have to work harder to pump the blood forward. If severe enough, the output of the heart may drop and cause symptoms such as fatigue or shortness of breath. Fortunately, rheumatic fever is now rare in the U.S. So we see much less mitral stenosis. Surgery can correct the problem. Read more...
Mitral valve. The mitral valve has to open properly to let blood flow into the left ventricle from the atrium. If it doesn't, we call this stenosis. It has to close to keep the blood flowing toward the body, if it does not; we call this regurgitation or insufficiency. Either or both problems can exist with the valve if its abnormal. Insufficiency is more common. Read more...

What is the significance of stenosis of the mitral valve?

It varies. Mild stenosis may casue no problems. Severe stenosis causes the pressure to increase in the left atrium, the lungs and eventually the right side of the heart. The left atrium enlarges in response to the higher pressure and the likelihood of atrial arrhythmias increases. Fluid can accumulate in the lungs causing shortness of breath and exercise intolerance. Read more...
Mitral stenosis. Mitral stenosis is caused by rheumatic fever. If the valve becomes severely stenotic ("blocked"), blood doesn't flow into the left ventricle adequately. This results in congestive heart failure and, if untreated, ultimatedly death. Mitral commissurotomy or replacement fixes the problem. Read more...

What is the significance of mitral valve stenosis?

Mitral stenosis. Mitral stenosis is a narrowing of the mitral valve caused by rheumatic fever. Progressive narrowing of the mitral valve can cause heart rhythm disturbances and the development of heart failure symptoms. This condition can be corrected with either mitral balloon valvuloplasty or surgery. Read more...
Rheumatic fever. It means that you had (whether or not you know it) rheumatic fever with scarring of your valve. When severe, it causes atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure. When it causes symptoms, it requires surgical intervention with commissurotomy or valve replacement. Read more...

My wife had heart surg 6 years ago at age 21 for replacement of mitral valve (mechanical). She maintains proper inr. Any clinical significance needed?

Unfortunately. Unfortunately without knowing the type of valve, and the full medical and medication history many of us here will be hesitant to make any comments. I would assume her cardiologist or heart surgeon has her on a strict program of diet and exercise and medications. They surely will also have her on a schedule for routine monitoring visits. Read more...

Cardiologist expained from recent ECG a very slightly rightward axis just as it had done before. And was otherwise completely normal. Significance? Could this be due to my Mitral Valve repair I wanted a clear idea of what this means.

There are a number. of reasons for a "slight right axis" on EKG but the most usual is "NORMAL FOR THE INDIVIDUAL." IT is unlikely to be related to your MV repair and has absolutely no clinical significance cardiac wise. Potentially it could reflect pulmonary issues such as longstanding COPD or asthma. In your case it is just the way you were made. Relax. Read more...

What does mitral valve do in the body?

See below. The mitral valve regulates the inflow of the heart into the left ventricle and regulates the flow between the high chamber of the heart (atrium) and the low chamber of the heart (ventricle) on the left side. And it prevents the blood from going back into the lungs on the left side. Read more...
Mitral valve. The mitral valve has to open properly to let blood flow into the left ventricle from the atrium. If it doesn't, we call this stenosis. It has to close to keep the blood flowing toward the body, if it doesn't we call this regurgitation or insufficiency. Either or both problems can exist with the valve if its abnormal. Insufficiency is more common. Read more...

Where do you hear mitral valve?

Under left nipple. Well, the point of maximal impulse of the heart, that is where we feel and can see the heart contract, is called the mitral area.The sound made by the valve closing is usually loudest at that point. It is usually just below the left nipple but could be displaced if the heart is enlarged. The valve sound can be heard in other areas but is not as loud. Read more...
Mitral. You generally don't hear the mitral valve unless it is a mechanical artificial valve. When you do hear it, usually there is flow abnormality and conduction of the sound through the body to the hearing apparatus in the ear. Read more...