What is the life expectancy of mitral stenosis?

Variable. Mitral stenosis can cause disabling heart failure in the 40s or lesser symptoms later in life. The disease is becoming quite uncommon in United States and is more often seen in patients born overseas. In cases detected early, and the valve is repaired or replaced, the life expectancy should be the same as a healthy patient of the same age.
Depends. Mitral stenosis caused by previous rheumatic fever typically continues to slowly worsen over time. Left untreated this is very serious and life threatening. It may 10-20 yrs or more to worsen to point of being a concern. Surgical treatment of mitral stenosis is available and effective. If treated at the appropriate time life expectancy should be normal.

Related Questions

What would life expectancy be if mitral stenosis?

Variable. Severe = short mild = normal the devil is in the details. (it's treatable so people don't die of MS like they used to). Read more...

How do you treat mitral stenosis?

Meds, surgery. A good article on mitral valve stenosis is on mayoclinic.Com. Treatments are medications: 'water pills' (loop diuretics), blood pressure pills (beta blockers or calcium channel blockers) and possibly 'blood thinners'. You may have to treat a heart rhythm called 'atrial fibrillation'. 2 procedures are done to repair mitral valve stenosis :valvotomy or valve replacement. The cardiologist will help. Read more...
It depends on cause. Mitral stenosis may be mild and not require specific therapy. For more significant mitral stenosis, treatment is either catheter-based or surgical. Catheter-based therapies involve feeding a balloon-tipped catheter through a large blood vessel in the groin into the heart and across the narrowed mitral valve. The balloon is inflated with relief of stenosis. Surgery involves repair or replacement. Read more...

Can one die from mitral stenosis?

Yes. Absolutely, although this is rare in the United States. Causes of death would include stroke (secondary to associated atrial fibrillation) or end-stage congestive heart failure. Read more...
Yes if untreated. Mitral stenosis is tightness in the mitral valve which makes filling of the main pumping chamber difficult. Typically it is a slowly progressing problem often a result of rheumatic fever many years earlier. The treatment is medical management until it progresses to a particular state at which point the valve is often replaced, but it can be repaired at times. Read more...

What does mitral stenosis results in?

Depends on severity. Progressively restricted opening of the mitral valve, measured by serial echocardiography, results in higher pressures in the lung circulation and reduced cardiac output when exercising. Worsening shortness of breath and cardiac arrhythmias may be the result. There are evidence based guidelines to help your doctors decide when to intervene to improve quality and length of life. Read more...
Depends. Mitral stenosis restricts the blood flow from the lungs into the left ventricle (main pumping chamber). So the pressure builds in the left atrium and it dilates. The pressure also builds in the lungs. The left ventricle has trouble filling so it pumps less blood to the body. So as stenosis worsens patients develop shortness of breath, funny heart beats, heart failure, high blood press in lungs. Read more...

What's a simple way to say what mitral stenosis really is?

Narrowing. Mitral stenosis is narrowing in the valve orifice. This abnormal valve doesn't open properly, blocking blood flow coming into your left ventricle, the main pumping chamber of your heart. Read more...
Narrow gate. Narrowing of the gate between the left upper and left lower chambers. This prevents blood from freely entering the lower chamber thus reducing amount of blood available to be pumped causing fatigue.Also there is build up of back pressure hence water logging of lungs, liver, abdomen and limbs causing shortness of breath, nausea, poor appetite and leg swelling. Symptoms depend on degree of narrowing. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Mitral stenosis?

Mitral stenosis. Mitral stenosis is a valvular heart disease which narrows the opening of the mitral valve. This decrease the flow of blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle of the heart. Read more...

Is there a cure for mitral stenosis?

Often. Diuretics, which increase urine formation, can reduce blood pressure in the lungs by reducing the volume of circulating blood. Beta-blockers, digoxin , and calcium channel blockers help control heart rhythms. Anticoagulants may be needed to prevent clot formation in people with atrial fibrillation. If drug therapy does not reduce the symptoms satisfactorily, the valve may be repaired or replace. Read more...
Not exactly. There are several treatment options but no medicine can open the valve. These treatments can reduce the blockage but the falve is still abnormal or replaced with an artificial valve. Sometime a ballon can be inserted thru the valve to stretch it open and improve flow. Rarely can the valve be repaired (unlike a leaking valve which is usually repaired). It can be replaced with an artificial valve. Read more...

Is mitral stenosis fatal? Can it be cured?

Yes and treated. Mitral stenosis left untreated is slowly progressive and ultimately fatal. However, it's treatable. The most common treatment is mitral valve replacement. Many patients can go on to live relatively normal lives. Other treatment options include mitral valve repair (not as frequent as mitral regurge) and balloon valvuloplasty. The key is routine follow up so that timing of treatment is best for you. Read more...
See below. Ms(mitral stenosis) is not fatal if treated appropriately. Once diagnosed, close follow up necessary. If the patient develops symptoms such as shortness of breath, afib, pulmonary hypertension, chf, ...Or a mean gradients> 10, mitral valve area <1. For best results, surgical replacement is required. Balloon valvuloplasty is possible but not all patients are candidates. Read more...