What precautions should be taken in prescribing an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

AICD. An aicd is recommended for very specific conditions and following very specific and well documented indications as published by professional societies (american college of cardiology, american heart association, european society of cardiology etc...) any prescription/recommendation has to follow these indications.
A few precautions. Please visit the following website for a complete list http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator/my00336/dsection=results.

Related Questions

How does an implantable cardioverter defibrillator function?

Detection. It detects fast heart beats above a threshold set by the cardiologist and programmed into the defibrillator and delivers a shock or atp - pacemaker override, depending on the heart rate. It will deliver subsequent shocks depending on the heart rate it detects. Read more...
Defibrillators. The device has an antenna that monitors the electrical activity of the heart. If the recorded parameters fit those of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, the device will charge its capacitor and deliver programmed shocks to try and return the rhythm to normal. It is a computer and programmed to do its functions. They are very effective but not perfect. Read more...

Is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator usually efficient?

Yes. Implanted cardioverter defibrillators (icds) are the most effective treatment in terminating dangerous arrhythmias. Icds are not 100% effective, but are significantly better than medication alone. Read more...
Yes. Aicd can detect rapid heart beat and stop the cardiac arrhythmias by either overdrive pacing or delivering the shock. It is programmed at certain zone of heart rate. For exemple if it is programmed at 180 beats the device will deliver the treatment at at heart rate of above 180. Read more...

What conditions can be treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

New Guidelines. This is somewhat complex and will not all fit in 400 characters so I am creating initials. 1. Ischemic cardiomyopathy, i.C., with ejection fraction, ef, >30% but <35%, newyork heartassoc, nyha, class ii or iii, and >30 days post mi/revascularization. 2. Ic, ef <30%. 3. Ic, ef between 36-40% with inducible ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, 4. Non-ic with ef <35% and nyha class ii or greater. Read more...
Arrhythmias. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (icd) is primarily used to treat abnormally rapid heart rates that are considered to be life threatening. The most common of these conditions are ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. These devices can also act as pacemakers to treat low heart rates, but this is a secondary function. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

Heart rhythm device. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or icd, is a small device that can automatically detect abnormally fast heart rhythms and stop them with a rapid pulse of paced beats or a shock. It monitors the heart rate and delivers the treatment through special wires, or leads, that may be attached to the inside or outside of the heart or placed under the skin. Most icds also have pacemaker function. Read more...

What patients need an implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

Ventricular Arrhythm. Patients that have dangerous arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation are the usual candidates for an implanted cardio-verter defibrillator or icd. Read more...
VT/VF, certain other. In addition to preventing dangerous ventricular arrhythmias (which can cause sudden cardiac death) in people who have had these, in certain select cases cardioverter defibrillators have use for prevention of these heart rhythms in people who are at high risk for them. This can include certain cardiomyopathies, also some cases of congestive heart failure (combined with a biventricular pacemaker). Read more...

How do you relieve pain from implantable cardioverter defibrillator surgery?

Pain and AICD. Post-operative pain is normal but should not be excessive. First, what is the cause of the pain? If the surgical site is red, swollen, or oozing fluid, contact the implanting physician immediately. The problem could be serious. Read more...
Tylenol (acetaminophen) It will improve over time- it is uncomfortable because it is quite a large device under the skin, but your body will get use to it. Until then just tylenol, (acetaminophen) and perhaps advil if you can tolerate it. Good luck. Read more...

What are the risks are associated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

AICD. First of, this is a life saving device for individuals needing one! as this is inserted using surgical techniques, risks associated are bleeding, infection etc... Once implanted the device or leads can malfunction or administer an inappropriate shock etc.. Bottom line: very high benefit (stay alive), low risk. Read more...
Tiny risk. An icd is indicated for people who are judged to be at significant risk for sudden cardiac death. Not implanting an icd in this context confers a far higher risk than the procedure which, itself, is a relatively simple and low risk minor operation done with sedation and local anesthetic. There are small risks of bleeding, blood clot and infection. Read more...

What is the morbidity rate for people with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Short vs Long Term. Device insertion is very safe, with estimated 2% risk of complications (bleeding, infection). Depending on the person's age and health status, they may have the defibrillator for many years. There is a low risk of infection of device in future (rough estimates of this are single digit to 10%), and risk of getting inappropriate shocks from the device (causing anxiety) is in this rough range as well. Read more...
Minimal. About 1% or less -- the morbidity is more from the heart disease and others but not from having an icd implanted. Read more...