Is idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis for ablations safe?

Find the right dr. I believe you're referring to alcohol septal ablation, where alcohol is instilled into coronary artery to kill muscle that, due to genetic disease, has grown out of control. The procedure has a steep learning curve, with a fine line between achieving the desired result and damaging adjacent healthy tissue. An experienced physician is crucial--ballpark figure is at least 100-200 prior procedures.
IHSS. Are you asking about septal alcohol ablation for the obstructive component of ihss or ablation of abnormal rhythms? Both procedures are commonly performed. Their appropriateness for you is something to be discussed with your doctors.

Related Questions

What is the genome for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis?

Autosomal Dominant. Ihss is caused by mutations in sarcomere genes and is the most common monogenic cardiovascular disorder. Read more...
Autosomal Dom. Many genes code for this anomaly of sarcomere proteins: chr 14 in the beta-myosin heavy chain; protein c cardiac myosin. This error creates some degree of left ventricular hypertrophy involving the septum between the ventricles: asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Lethal arrhythmias may occur. Genetic testing is available. Seek opinion of a cardiologist. Read more...

What is scientific definition of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis?

Obstruction. Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis, or ihss derives from an unknown etiology. Usually the muscle along the left ventricular outflow tract, beneath the aortic valve grows in size. It then can affect the flow of blood out of the heart because it forms an obstruction. The degree of obstruction correlates to symptoms and the degree of severity of the condition. Read more...
Ok. Idiopathic--unknown cause hypertrophic-thickened enlarged sub aortic below aortic valve septal - inner wall of the heart between left and right ventricles stenosis- narrowing of the left ventricular outflow in this situation. Read more...

How does preload affect the loudness of the murmur of subaortic stenosis?

Nice question! Excellent - physiology at work! in subaortic stenosis, it is basically the muscular component of left ventricular outflow tract which is narrow. With increased preload - greater blood in lv - this stretches the muscle and allows for easier exit through the lvot and softer sound of murmur. Read more...

Is subaortic stenosis a muscluar dystrophy? My little sister has subaortic stenosis and im doing a project on muscular dystrophy and is wondering

No it is not. Subaortic stenosis does not appear to occur more commonly in individuals with muscular dystrophy. Read more...
Not quite. Subaortic stenosis is a congenital (i.e. Birth defect) problem with the development of the part of the heart just below its' last valve (the aortic). The cause is not well known, but the problem is just in that part of the heart. Muscular dystrophy's are conditions that effect muscle throughout the body, some more than others. They can also affect the heart. Read more...

Can you explain subaortic stenosis?

MANY OPTIONS. 1st q to ask: was the laminectomy appropriate tx of choice initially? Signific # of back pain pts are s/p laminectomy. Was laminectomy for stenosis or herniated disc & then u developed stenosis subsequently? Back surgeries r great if successful 1st surgery. If not, repeat surgery has very poor success rates.Natural options always better.Lose wt #1, if overwt. Then research the many other options. Read more...

Is my subaortic stenosis a serious problem? The report said: Severe LVOT obstruction. AV : Thin mobile AV, Gradient 66.4mmHg (mean) and peak of 127mmHg.

Subaortic stenosis Gradient 66.4mmHg. You have a congenital condition. Surgery is the only option to decrease the gradient, you have over 50 mm Hg gradient, therefore you are above the recommended gradient. Do you Have a cardiologist, and did not recommended surgery?. See a cardiac surgeon, there are new per-cutaneous techniques via the femoral artery, see if you qualify. The only option for you is surgery. Read more...

Dr heard small murmur. Went to cardiologist and echo/doppler was normal. He says its innocent. What about things it can miss, like subaortic stenosis? Would the doppler have picked it up?

Echo is reliable. More likely than not the echo is correct and the murmur if present was an artifact. Read more...
Depends on Quality. As always, who has the most vested interest in your status & tests? Who should have their own copies of the data, including all the echo video images? A reasonably well performed echocardiogram should easily detect subaortic stenosis from the apical view on continuous wave doppler (ie. All velocities along the line of focus). Get & keep a copy of your images (& report) and examine carefully! Read more...
Hard to miss. A murmur is a noise the doctor hears when listening. They can be benign (from blood being ejected out) or more pathologic. A high quality echo study, preferably done in an accredited lab, should tell you what the murmur is from. It should not miss sub aortic stenosis. Good luck. Read more...
Yes. The echo is great about picking up things you mentioned. It is likely a pulmonary flow murmur. If you have no symptoms, you are probably fine, but if you have symptoms, especially with activity, you could consider asking for a "stress echo." hope this helped! Read more...