5 doctors weighed in:

What is the difference between venous blood pressure and arterial blood pressure?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Jost
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: See Below

Venous blood pressure is in the venous system and usually should not exceed 5-8 mmhg.
The venous system takes de-oxygneated blood back to the heart. Arterial blood pressure is in the arteries, ie taking oxygen to the body, and is usually more than 70 mmhg for the diastolic and 130mmhg for the systolic.

In brief: See Below

Venous blood pressure is in the venous system and usually should not exceed 5-8 mmhg.
The venous system takes de-oxygneated blood back to the heart. Arterial blood pressure is in the arteries, ie taking oxygen to the body, and is usually more than 70 mmhg for the diastolic and 130mmhg for the systolic.
Dr. Charles Jost
Dr. Charles Jost
Thank
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Arteries and veins

Arteries are thick walled, smaller, high pressure conduits that bring oxygenated blood from the heart to the periphery.
Veins are thin walled, low pressure larger vessels that return oxygen poor blood to the heart (and lungs). Routine blood pressure readings refer to arterial pressure. It is possible to measure venous pressure (which is generally in the 35/0 range) but it's not done routinely.

In brief: Arteries and veins

Arteries are thick walled, smaller, high pressure conduits that bring oxygenated blood from the heart to the periphery.
Veins are thin walled, low pressure larger vessels that return oxygen poor blood to the heart (and lungs). Routine blood pressure readings refer to arterial pressure. It is possible to measure venous pressure (which is generally in the 35/0 range) but it's not done routinely.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
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