Why do you need a heart transplant?

Weak heart muscle. If the heart muscle gets very weak for whatever reason, it may not be able to pump the blood adequately. Therefore if the problem is severe enough and does not improve with medication, sometimes they only treatment left is to remove the diseased heart and tranplant a healthy heart.
Heart failure. When there are proper indications of an absolutely failing heart on major medications, and perhaps with an lvad (left ventricular assist device )in place, a person will be considered and "listed". The surgery requires heart lung machine support of the recipient while their heart is removed and the donor heart is sewn in place.

Related Questions

For what kind of disease would you need a heart transplant?

Heart failure. The common background of any need for organ transplantion is the recipient organ fialure. For heart tranplant, the indicationis as well is heart fialure non responsive to medical management. Many diseases may damage the heart with death of the functional muscle cells. The most common of those diseases is ischemia, i.e. Coronary artery disease. Read more...
There are several. Heart transplant recipients are in heart failure. About 33% have coronary artery disease; 53% have cardiomyopathy, and 10% have congenital heart disease as the most common diagnoses leading to transplant in the us. Read more...

If you have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy do you need a heart transplant?

Cardiomyopathy. Some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may have a mild form and live a normal lifespan. Some patients may have more severe forms that are progressive necessitating surgery, or resulting in arrythmias, fainting, heart failire or even evolving into a dilated cardiomyopathy requiring heart transplant in the most severe cases. Close follow up with a doctor is important with this condition. Read more...

Can alcohol affect the heart in such a way that someone would need a heart transplant?

Yes. There is something called "alcoholic cardiomyopathy" and it can make the heart so weak, that only a transplant will prolong life. However, hearts are so hard to obtain, a person who hasn't maintained sobriety will not be a candidate for transplantation (Catch-22). Read more...

I was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, what is the likelihood that I would need a heart transplant?

What is the EF? Cardiomyopathy is a generic term that can caused by a variety of medical conditions. The functional condition of the heart, often called the ejection fraction gives an estimate of the severity. The degree of impairment and the causative problem are what dictates the need for transplantation. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the severity , symptoms , underlying cause and response or lack of response to treatment. A cardiologist can outline a treatment plan for you. Read more...
Small but real. Most patients with cardiomyopathy recover. A small number have progressive disease that destroys heart function. You should discuss this with your cardiologist that made the diagnosis. Read more...

Will my child need a heart transplant if she only has a single ventricle?

No. As long as the rest of her heart is in good condition, surgery can usually repair a single ventricle. Heart transplants are usually only done if all the heart muscle is damaged. Read more...
Hopefully not. 350-400 pediatric heart transplants procedures occur worldwide annually. The number of children who have failing cardiac function late after palliative surgery for congenital heart disease is increasing. An example is "failed fontan" - the usual repair for a single ventricle.One of the most common indications for infant heart transplantation is hypoplastic left heart - a single ventricle. Read more...
Possible. Every child is different, so it is impossible to predict what will happen to your child. Remember that statistics apply to a whole population, not each individual. But in general, ~ one-third of single-ventricle patients require a transplant during their life-time with today's medical knowledge. Remember, these statistics change as medicine improves too. Please discuss with peds cardio. Read more...

Will my child need a heart transplant if he has pulmonic stenosis?

NO. I have had many patients with pulmonic stenosis and they have not needed transplants. Most people live a perfectly normal life. It depends on the degree of stenosis. Some people may need their valve replaced as adults. A cardiologist can offer more information. Read more...
No. Pulmonary stenosis (ps) without other heart problems is relatvely easy to manage. Only a small fraction of children with ps require any sort of repair, which is often possible with a catheter procedure rather than surgery. Heart transplant would not be considered unless there were other more severe cardiac issues in addition to ps. Read more...
No. There is an exception to every rule, but a heart transplant is not something i associate with isolated pulmonary stenosis. Read more...

Mom has 5% heart function and dr says she doesn't need a heart transplant? She has 13 stints, defib., cad, chf, and COPD and she's only 45.

Get second opinion. Mom needs to be referred to a transplant center. She must not be a smoker else she will not be a candidate. She will have to get special blood work. With her copd, this is an added risk for any surgery. Having said this, get second opinion from a well recognized transplant center. Read more...
5% heart function . If all major arteries are open and there is no lack of blood supply then transplant is the answer. A repeat evaluation of ejection fraction will help. An ef of 5% is usually not consistent with life. I have seen many people with 15 % function improve to 40 % after cabg. All individual situations are unique and need direct input from a cardiologist and a surgeon. Read more...