3 doctors weighed in:
How can someone separate the HDL molecule from cholesterol?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Michael Fenster
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Lab tests
Cholesterol is combined in the body with proteins to form compounds known as lipoproteins.
These proteins take many shapes and sizes. Laboratory tests can fractionate some of these into a group known as low density liporpoteins, or 'ldl' cholesterol which is often referred to as 'bad' cholesterol. Another fraction is high density lipoproteins or 'hdl' often reffered to as 'good' cholesterol.

In brief: Lab tests
Cholesterol is combined in the body with proteins to form compounds known as lipoproteins.
These proteins take many shapes and sizes. Laboratory tests can fractionate some of these into a group known as low density liporpoteins, or 'ldl' cholesterol which is often referred to as 'bad' cholesterol. Another fraction is high density lipoproteins or 'hdl' often reffered to as 'good' cholesterol.
Dr. Michael Fenster
Dr. Michael Fenster
Thank
Dr. William Cromwell
Clinical Lipidology
In brief: Lipoprotein Tests
High density lipoprotein (HDL) can be quantified in various ways.
Beyond simply measuring cholesterol in HDL (hdl-c), HDL particles can be characterized qualitatively by size (small, medium, large) via electrophesis or density (more dense, less dense) via ultracentrifugation, as well as quantitative by HDL particle number (total, large, medium, small hdl-p) via nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr).

In brief: Lipoprotein Tests
High density lipoprotein (HDL) can be quantified in various ways.
Beyond simply measuring cholesterol in HDL (hdl-c), HDL particles can be characterized qualitatively by size (small, medium, large) via electrophesis or density (more dense, less dense) via ultracentrifugation, as well as quantitative by HDL particle number (total, large, medium, small hdl-p) via nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr).
Dr. William Cromwell
Dr. William Cromwell
Thank
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