What type of doctor would treat dilated cardiomyopathy?

Cardiologists. CHF specialists are now certified to treat this condition.
Cardiologist. A cardiologist is a heart doctor and not a heart surgeon.
Cardiologist. Make sure you find one who specializes in the treatment of heart failure; usually at an academic center, and if it is really severe, someone affiliated with a transplant center.

Related Questions

How could someone have dilated cardiomyopathy and die from it, but doctors never found it? Wouldn't that show on echo or exam?

Cardiomyopathy . Excellent question. Studies show people with cardiomyopathy may have no symptoms but according to the CDC still be at risk for sudden death. Dilated cardiomyopathy can be idiopathic primary or acquired (cocaine,alcohol,diabetic, ischemic) and is actually defined as enlarged volume in heart chambers <40% ejection fraction. WHO-Collectively the most common etiology of clinical heart failure. . Read more...

Does a dilated cardiomyopathy disappears when Wilson's disease is treated?

Error. To the best of my knowledge (and I just did check in 2 textbooks), Wilson's Disease which, untreated, can cause lethal liver failure, does not cause a cardiomyopathy. I certainly have never seen a case in 40 years as a physician. If you have a cardiomyopathy and Wilson's Disease, I would have to suspect that they're unrelated problems. Please correct me if you know this to be untrue. Read more...
Wilson's disease. Cardiomyopathy is a rare but well documented complication of Wilson's disease which is is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which copper accumulates in tissues. Whether the cardiomyopathy is reversible is questionable and depends on too many other factors to be definitive for any given individual. Read more...

How can you treat dilated cardiomyopathy?

Depends. Meds such as acei, b-blockers, water pills, digoxin.Devices such as aicd bi-ventricular pacemakers and left ventricular assist devices. Some pts are transplant candidates. Salt restriction , abstinence from alcohol, aerobic exercize, . Read more...
Depends. Depends on how severe it is. Milder forms can be controlled with medications, which is the majority of patients, and a relatively normal lifestyle is quite possible. The most severe cases may be eligible for heart transplantation, talk to your doctor. Read more...

If I develop dilated cardiomyopathy, how will it be treated?

Medication. It depends on the reason for the cardiomyopathy. If it is due to disease in the coronary arteries then there are procedure that can open the blood flow to the heart muscle. Otherwise medications are used to help the heart function more efficiently. Occasionally there are reversible causes like thyroid disease. A cardiologist is the best person to discuss this with. Read more...
Multifacet approach. Beta blockers, ace inhibitors/ arb agents plus aldosterone inhibitor (spironolactone or eplerenone) are mainstay. In addition based upon amount of fluid retention a loop diuretic such as Furosemide is added. Devices such as icd (implantable defibrillator) and crt (cardiac resynchronization therapy) is appropriate in some patients. Salt restriction and exercise program helps. Read more...

Do you think it's possible for Ehlers danlos syndrome type 3 to weaken tissues like the heart and be more suceptible to dilated cardiomyopathy etc?

Ehrlurs Danlos. type 3- is more common and that is hypermobility syndrome has less chance of cardiac involvement like that seen in type4 ED where there is problems with the wall of the arteries including aorta and cerebral vesseles cardiac dialatation is less commonly seen I hope this helps. Read more...

Can a vad help with dilated cardiomyopathy?

Yes. If the cardiomypoathy is severe, and potentially reversible, the lvad can support the circulation while the heart function recovers. In the case of a severe cardiomyopathy, the VAD can support the circulation until a transplant is available, or in some cased be a permanent support instead of a transplant. Most cardiomyopathies are not so severe, and can be treated with medicaions, or a biv pacer. Read more...