How long can a child live with dilated cardiomyopathy with medicines?

Depends. Depends on how severe it is. Milder forms can be controlled with medications, which is the majority of patients, and a relatively normal lifestyle is quite possible. The most severe cases may be eligible for heart transplantation, talk to your doctor.
Quite variable. It depends on a lot of things but the bottom line is that the length of survival varies greatly. Some children or adults live a very long time with severe disease of the heart muscle. Of course, the treatment will affect this but in an individual case it is just hard to predict.

Related Questions

Can a child have dilated cardiomyopathy like an adult?

Yes. Rare but there is. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been identified as one of causes of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Read more...
Yes. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscle is weakened and the heart is enlarged. The most common cause in childhood is an infection with a virus, often the same sorts of viruses that cause the stomach flu (enteroviruses). Some other causes include genetic problems, muscular dystrophy, toxic exposures (including drugs), heart rhythm problems and malformations of the heart. Read more...
Yes. They can, although it is uncommon. It can improve, stabilize, or worsen and require transplant. They can also have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy like adults, which is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Read more...

Are genetics involved if a child has a dilated cardiomyopathy?

Yes, in some cases. Nearly 20 % of cases of dilated cardiomyopathy have a familial basis. Read more...
Could be. There are several genetic locations have been identified in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which can be mutation or inhereted. Read more...
Frequently. Current evidence supports that at least 35% of patients with nonsyndromic dilated cardiomyopathy are familial (probably genetic) or genetic in etiology. Defects in contractile proteins, sarcolemmal proteins, and ion channel proteins have been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, but there are autosomal recessive and x-linked defects. Read more...

Can certain medicines lead to dilated cardiomyopathy?

Yes. There are some known agents. A good example is chemotherapeutic agents. Read more...

What is the long-term outlook of dilated cardiomyopathy?

Depends. Depends on how severe it is. Milder forms can be controlled with medications, which is the majority of patients, and a normal lifestyle is quite possible. The most severe cases may be eligible for heart transplantation, talk to your doctor. Read more...
Depends. Needs close follow up by an expert doc. One can live many years if monitored and managed by an expert doc without doc sudden death is easily possible. Read more...

Does personalized medicine apply to diagnosis of typical conditions like dilated cardiomyopathy? What tests are needed?

Concierge? By "personalized" medicine, i'm presuming you're referring to "concierge" medicine since all medical practice should be personalized. Concierge is a business model-you pay a regular fee and the doc is "your doc". How complete the care will be depends on his/her specialty. Dilated cardiomyopathy is diagnosed by echo and confirmed by heart cath. Cardiologists routinely take care of such patients. Read more...
Echo. Cardiomyopathy is a weakened heart muscle. The diagnosis can be confirmed by an echocardiogram which takes an ultrasound picture of the heart and can show its pumping function. Further tests may need to be done to assess the cause. These tests can include a cardiac cath to rule out coronary artery disease, and even rarely a biopsy of the heart muscle. Personalized medicine is non specific term. Read more...