3 doctors weighed in:

Is coronary artery disease acute or chronic?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Chronic is Typical

Artery disease, especially in the heart arteries, is dominant human behavior, typically starts in childhood yet is typically ignored for decades because it remains asymptomatic until plaque ruptures release debris, triggers clots & suddenly blocks blood flow.
These plaque ruptures are the basis for acute symptomatic disease. Thus best to treat the driving factors early, not wait for symptoms.

In brief: Chronic is Typical

Artery disease, especially in the heart arteries, is dominant human behavior, typically starts in childhood yet is typically ignored for decades because it remains asymptomatic until plaque ruptures release debris, triggers clots & suddenly blocks blood flow.
These plaque ruptures are the basis for acute symptomatic disease. Thus best to treat the driving factors early, not wait for symptoms.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
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2 comments
Dr. Robert Koch
Acute spontaneous coronary plaque rupture causes an acute myocardial infarction or heart attack, however, the chronic presence of cholesterol- laden plaque presiding on the inner lining of our coronary arteries predisposes the individual to the acute event. Therefore, any action that reduces or stabilized the chronic plaque should reduce the chance that a sudden heart attack would occur.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
The driving factors are NOT cholesterol (part of all animal cell membranes, produced by all animal cells) but other than low Low Density Lipoproteins (in umo/L) + lack of high Large High Density Lipoproteins (in nmol/L) concentrations + above low Nl glucose concentrations (e.g. HbA1c < 5.0%), above low Nl Systolic BP, elevated Lipoprotein(a), Lipoprotein lipase A2, etc. See my other answers.
Dr. Francis Uricchio
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: Both

It can also be chronic producing stable angina, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.

In brief: Both

It can also be chronic producing stable angina, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.
Dr. Francis Uricchio
Dr. Francis Uricchio
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