2 doctors weighed in:
Who needs a defibrillator?
2 doctors weighed in

Dr. Nathan Ritter
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
In brief: See below
Reasons: 1) weak heart pumping function (ejection fraction less than or = to 35%).
2) dangerous fast heart rhythms, with or without passing out. 3) arvd (abnormality of right side of heart) and symptoms of passing out or dangerous heart rhythm. 4) severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with or without passing out. 5) long qt syndrome or brugada syndrome with history of dangerous rhythm in family.

In brief: See below
Reasons: 1) weak heart pumping function (ejection fraction less than or = to 35%).
2) dangerous fast heart rhythms, with or without passing out. 3) arvd (abnormality of right side of heart) and symptoms of passing out or dangerous heart rhythm. 4) severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with or without passing out. 5) long qt syndrome or brugada syndrome with history of dangerous rhythm in family.
Dr. Nathan Ritter
Dr. Nathan Ritter
Thank
Dr. Charles Jost
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
In brief: ICD - new guidelines
This is somewhat complex and will not all fit in 400 characters so I am creating initials.
1. Ischemic cardiomyopathy, i.C., with ejection fraction, ef, >30% but <35%, newyork heartassoc, nyha, class ii or iii, and >30 days post mi/revascularization. 2. Ic, ef <30%. 3. Ic, ef between 36-40% with inducible ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, 4. Non-ic with ef <35% and nyha class ii or greater.

In brief: ICD - new guidelines
This is somewhat complex and will not all fit in 400 characters so I am creating initials.
1. Ischemic cardiomyopathy, i.C., with ejection fraction, ef, >30% but <35%, newyork heartassoc, nyha, class ii or iii, and >30 days post mi/revascularization. 2. Ic, ef <30%. 3. Ic, ef between 36-40% with inducible ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, 4. Non-ic with ef <35% and nyha class ii or greater.
Dr. Charles Jost
Dr. Charles Jost
Thank
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