What type of defibrillator is a cardioverter-defibrillator?

All of them. All cardiac defibrillators are cardioverter-defibrillators.
Two types. External and internal. External automated external defibrillator (AED) is placed over the skin. Internal under the skin with wire in the heart, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators work by detecting and stopping abnormal heartbeats. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator continuously monitors your heartbeat and delivers extra beats or electrical shocks to restore a normal heart rhythm.

Related Questions

What is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

Life saver. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (icd) system has leads (wires) that are inserted through the veins under the collarbone and threaded to the heart. The leads are attached to a box that goes under the skin. The box has a computer that continuously monitors the signals from your heart for a dangerous arrhythmia. If this occurs, the icd stops the arrhythmia by delivering an internal shock. Read more...
ICD. Icds are implanted to monitor the electrical activity of very abnormal hearts to see if a life threatening rhythm occurs. If it detects one of these rhythms, it will charge its capacitor and fire a shock to defibrillate the heart back to stable rhythm. In appropriate patients these devices save lives. Read more...

What patients need an implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

Ventricular Arrhythm. Patients that have dangerous arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation are the usual candidates for an implanted cardio-verter defibrillator or icd. Read more...
VT/VF, certain other. In addition to preventing dangerous ventricular arrhythmias (which can cause sudden cardiac death) in people who have had these, in certain select cases cardioverter defibrillators have use for prevention of these heart rhythms in people who are at high risk for them. This can include certain cardiomyopathies, also some cases of congestive heart failure (combined with a biventricular pacemaker). Read more...

How does an implantable cardioverter defibrillator function?

Detection. It detects fast heart beats above a threshold set by the cardiologist and programmed into the defibrillator and delivers a shock or atp - pacemaker override, depending on the heart rate. It will deliver subsequent shocks depending on the heart rate it detects. Read more...
Defibrillators. The device has an antenna that monitors the electrical activity of the heart. If the recorded parameters fit those of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, the device will charge its capacitor and deliver programmed shocks to try and return the rhythm to normal. It is a computer and programmed to do its functions. They are very effective but not perfect. Read more...

Is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator usually efficient?

Yes. Implanted cardioverter defibrillators (icds) are the most effective treatment in terminating dangerous arrhythmias. Icds are not 100% effective, but are significantly better than medication alone. Read more...
Yes. Aicd can detect rapid heart beat and stop the cardiac arrhythmias by either overdrive pacing or delivering the shock. It is programmed at certain zone of heart rate. For exemple if it is programmed at 180 beats the device will deliver the treatment at at heart rate of above 180. Read more...

What is the function of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Shock the heart. The device has the abiltiy to sense when your heart is beating in an abnormal and dangerous way which could lead to you passing out or having your heart stop. It then delivers an electric shock to the heart to convert the abnormal rhythm back to normal. The device also can function as a pacemaker if your heart beat becomes too slow. Read more...
Terminate arrhythmia. These are devices which may detect and automatically treat malignant (life-threatening) arrhythmias. Those include ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. They use either bursts of rapid pacing or one or more high energy shocks. Patients receive these either after an arrhythmic event or prophylactically because they are at risk for these arrhythmias. Read more...

What are the main parts of a implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

See below. Strictly speaking, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator has a generator (box) and a shocking lead (wire that goes through the vein to the right ventricle). The generator holds the circuitry and the battery, the lead delivers the shock to the heart. Read more...

What is the significance of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Defibrillation. An automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (aicd) is a lfe-saving device. The device continuely monitors the heart rhythm. When an abnormal rhythm is detected it attempts to restore a normal sinus rhythm (nsr), a cardioversion via shock or pacing alogorithms. However, when it detects a life threatening rhythm such as ventricular fibrillation it applies an immediate shock to restore nsr. Read more...

What can I expect from using an 'implantable cardioverter defibrillator'?

Palpitations, jolt. If your heart has a serious rhythm problem, the device should intercede to correct it. When that happens, you may feel palpitations or a jolt in your chest. If the defibrillator didn't intervene, you might never feel anything again! Read more...