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Adenoma (liver) april 3, 2012 a CT scan was performed to rule out another pulmonary embolism . A large mass was detected on my liver and the radiology reports that it's a heptocellular adenoma. It was noted that on a previous CT scan in november of last

7 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: It's benign

Adenomas are benign tumors in the liver. They can grow but are usually not removed unless they are extremely large.

In brief: It's benign

Adenomas are benign tumors in the liver. They can grow but are usually not removed unless they are extremely large.
Dr. Corinne Deurdulian
Dr. Corinne Deurdulian
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Dr. Robert Andrews
Radiology - Interventional
2 doctors agree

In brief: Adenomas

Adenomas are benign tumors of the liver that are very commonly associated with the use of birth control pills.
They can usually be differentiated from other liver tumors on the basis of ct or mr scans alone (that is, without a biopsy). In general, you don't need to do anything for an adenoma other than to consider discontinuing oral contraceptives. Adenomas that grow, especially if they do so quickly--as yours apparently has--are more worrisome. Large adenomas can spontaneously bleed and are also at increased risk for becoming malignant. It's important to check on the measurements you're quoting. A change from 8 mm to 9.9 mm would be insignificant. On the other hand, a change from 8 mm to 9.9 cm (as you've indicated) would be an enormous increase and definitely worth further investigation.

In brief: Adenomas

Adenomas are benign tumors of the liver that are very commonly associated with the use of birth control pills.
They can usually be differentiated from other liver tumors on the basis of ct or mr scans alone (that is, without a biopsy). In general, you don't need to do anything for an adenoma other than to consider discontinuing oral contraceptives. Adenomas that grow, especially if they do so quickly--as yours apparently has--are more worrisome. Large adenomas can spontaneously bleed and are also at increased risk for becoming malignant. It's important to check on the measurements you're quoting. A change from 8 mm to 9.9 mm would be insignificant. On the other hand, a change from 8 mm to 9.9 cm (as you've indicated) would be an enormous increase and definitely worth further investigation.
Dr. Robert Andrews
Dr. Robert Andrews
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Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry

In brief: You

You might want to consider asking for a second opinion; especially if your provider has not educated you about why this change may have occurred.

In brief: You

You might want to consider asking for a second opinion; especially if your provider has not educated you about why this change may have occurred.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
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