Related Questions

What is the success rate for the "firm" procedure for atrial fibrillation and are there any additional risks having it done over a normal ablation

ClincalTrialsInEarly. stages; Study https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02101541. While ablation (killing heart muscle) continues being promoted & performed, success rates at 1 yr generally only ~10% in younger people in nominal excellent health (except for early onset A. fib.) Since A. fib is a form of CHF, rec: focus on the setup issues: optimize lipoproteins (no chol.), HbA1c . Read more...
Alternate technique. My understanding is that FIRM (focal impulse and rotor modulation) ablation is, perhaps, a more advanced ablation system using a very sophisticated catheter that, purportedly, maps locations/rotors that seemingly could trigger & sustain AF. Success up to 80% in controlling AF for 2 years is reported, better than with standard ablation. Risks should be similar. Careful case selection is important! Read more...

Do you think Atrial Fibrillation would improve with an ablation? Only remedy so far is cardioversion

Yes. RF ablation for atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter in good hands ought to be curative. Factors that determine success: electrophysiologists experience and record of success, duration of AF; size and function of Left atrium. Good luck! . Read more...

I understand that atrial fibrillation is a type of arrhythmia. Is ablation used to treat only afib or other arrhythmia conditions?

Many dysrhythmias. Ablation is a procedure used to treat many different types of dysrhythmias; atrial fibrillation is only the latest in a long line of dysrhythmias treated successfully by ablation. Ablative therapy has been used to treat supraventicular tachycardias such as av nodal reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, wolff-parkinson-white and others. It is also used to treat types of ventricular tachycardias. Read more...
Usually. Ablation can treat atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, but can also treat other conduction abnormalities, such as wolf-parkinson-white (WPW) syndrome, which involves an abnormal electrical connection between the atria and the ventricles of the heart. Read more...
It varies. Catheter ablation is available for many different types of arrhythmias - ventricular tachycardia, svt, as well as atrial fibrillation. They are all a bit different in technique as well as risks/success rates. Read more...
It's Versatile. Ablation is great for a lot of different kinds of heart rhythms. Tens of thousands of ablations are done every year and the majority to substantial success. Read more...
Multiple conditions. Ablation is used to treat many different cardiac rhythm problems, both in the upper and lower chambers of the heart. It is safe and highly effective. Many patients may be cured of their rhythm problems with ablation. Read more...

What is the indication for surgical ablation (av node ablation) for atrial fibrillation?

Rate control. To control the ventricular response rate (pulse rate) to the atrial fibrillation when all other medications have failed, contraindicated, or are not tolerated due to unacceptable side effects. Read more...
Varies. Cather ablation of the av node is reserved for patients who can not get the pulse rate under control by any other method - it is usually only used as a last resort. Before this, medications are tried, and usually some sort of catheter ablation for atrial fib specifically (not just the av node). A pacemaker is required prior to av node ablation. Read more...
AF ablation. Patients with atrial fibrillation and have difficulty controlling their rate can be treated with an av node ablation which is a procedure that damages the av node so that it won't conduct the beat. This results in complete heart block and is treated with a pacemaker. More recent treatments for af include an af ablation which gets rid of the af directly and does not require a pacemaker. Read more...
Definitive Control. We don't generally do this with surgery, but rather with a "catheter" based procedure (wire we thread into the heart that cauterizes the av node). This procedure provides complete control of the heart rate in the lower chamber and excellent symptom control, but makes people dependent on the pacemaker that *must* be implanted with this procedure. Read more...

O've had two heart surgeries as a child and had an ablation for atrial fibrillation. How often should I see my cardiologist?

Visit returns. Frequency for re checks really depends on the problem(s) and the symptoms. Not knowing what your surgeries were or the success of the ablation it is hard to say. If all has been repaired and no symptoms and sinus rhythm are stable, then yearly visits would likely be fine. If you're having problems, then they would dictate the frequency of return visits. Read more...

I need to undergo cardiac ablation to treat my atrial fibrillation, how do I select a doctor?

Electrophysiologist. A subspecialty of cardiology is specially trained and certified to perform this procedure. Have your pcp refer to you to one near you with the proper training and experience. Read more...
Eectrophysiologist. I agree that an electrophysiologist wil provide the best information regarding catheter ablation. It is important to ask questions regarding outcomes and success rates. I would recommend a university setting for this type of ablation that will provide the best staff as well as equipment. Read more...
It's Tough. Finding the most competent doctor in your area can be extremely difficult. Send me a message and i'll get you a name or two of some nationally recognized people not too far away. Read more...