Can atrial fibrillation affect ed?

Maybe. Afib can be a symptom of multiple medical problems that can affect sexual function. Metoprolol and other beta-blockers are common medications for afib that have negative impact on erections.
No, but the meds can. Atrial fib should not affect erectile dysfunction in any direct way. However, two classes of medications commonly used to control heart rate in atrial fib (beta blockers and calcium channel blockers) can cause ed, or more commonly worsen ED symptoms that already exist.

Related Questions

How come some people with atrial fibrillation don't even know it?

Depends. Atrial fibrillation by itself does not produce symptoms usually, it is often the fast heart rate that may result from it that causes the symptoms of "fluttering" in the chest. Even with fast heart rates some people do not feel anything in their chest because not everyone is as sensitive to these things to the same degree. Some people, feel fluttering and it is not related to their heart at all. Read more...

Funny how a diagnosis doesn't mean much till you have it. What is atrial fibrillation?

Electrical chaos. The electrical impulses in the upper chambers of your heart (mostly originating from the left side) are completely chaotic leading to a quivering motion of these chambers instead of their typical, coordinated pumping function. The lower chambers beat erratically, as the electrical impulses bombard them in a haphazard way. See a cardiologist or an elelctrophysiologist. Read more...
An irregular rhythm. Instead of responding to a single pacemaker in the upper part of the heart, many pacemakers appear and the lower part of the heart can respond to any of them. This results in an irregular rhythm which makes the pumping action of the heart less efficient. It can be caused by alcohol, valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease. Risk of stroke is increased. Read more...

What is atrial fibrillation?

Fast irregular pulse. When the small chambers of the heart ( atria) are beating very fast ( more than 300 beats per minute) the larger chambers beat fast and irregularly. Read more...
Irregular rhythm. Af is an irregular heart rhythm caused by uncoordinated electrical activity in the atria, or top chambers of the heart. Sometimes it is fast, other times it isn't. Read more...

What is atrial fibrillation?

Abnormal Heart Rhyth. It is an irregularity of your heart beat.It is quite common in older patients.You need to be under the care of a cardiologist as you may need to be placed on a blood thinner in order to avoid blood clots going into your circulation...This can cause a stroke...So be very attentive to see and follow your doctorr egularly.. Read more...
Arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (afib) is the most common sustained rhythm abnormality. It's characterized by an irregular heart rate. The upper chambers of the heart (atrium) do not beat but quiver. Many people don't notice it. But many do. It can lead to strokes in some patients so blood thinners are important. It can be treated with medications, ablation thru iv's in the groin or surgery. See a cardiologis. Read more...

Is atrial fibrillation inherited?

Sometimes. There is a gene that makes the tendency to get it more likely, but most a fib is due to environmental and aquired factors such as age, valvular heart disease and alcohol. Read more...
Rarely. If atrial fibrillation is inherited, it is most often because of some other associated condition which is also inherited. There are rare types of atrial fibrillation which can be inherited, but generally speaking it follows either aging or other disease processes. Read more...

Is atrial fibrillation hereditary?

Possibly. While there are no clear genes identified (and in fact we know relatively little about an issue that plagues so many people) there clearly are families in which atrial fibrillation is more common through the generations. So while this is far from medical fact, most physicians who treat a lot of atrial fibrillation would argue that there is likely some type of inheritance. Read more...
Rarely. Familial AF is described and little is known so far. Different genes have been implicated and it probably constitutes 5% or less of AF cases. Read more...

How is atrial fibrillation treated?

Several options. With medications to slow down the heart rate or control the heart rhythm, in the right setting blood thinners to minimize the risk of stroke, electrical shock to restore a normal rhythm and also catheter based approaches in order to remove the trigger for afib. Read more...
Several things... If heart rate is rapid, medications to slow it. Depending on your risk factors, blood thinners to decrease stroke risk. Electrical cardioversion to get back to normal rhythm. Antiarrythmic medications and/ or ablation treatment to maintain normal rhythm. Controlling blood pressure and statin medications to treat cholesterol also help. With proper meds many patients do okay with permanent afib. Read more...
Medications. There are a variety of medications which can either control the heart rate or convert the rhythm back to normal. Sometimes cardioversion is used to correct the heart rhythm. Also in some cases ablation can be done which will correct the abnormal rhythm. Read more...

What can cause atrial fibrillation?

There are many. Causes for atrial fibrillation. An easy one to evaluate for is an over active thyroid by checking a tsh. Other causes are anything that causes structural damage to the heart. High blood pressure, heart attacks, abnormal heart valves, heart defects you're born with (congenital), metabolic imbalance, exposure to stimulants, emphysema or other lung diseases, previous heart surgery, sleep apnea... Read more...
Atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation , or afib, is a very common rhythm disturbance, the most common in this country. It is most often associated with hypertension, but can also be associated with valvular disease specifically mitral valve disease. It can be treated with either rate control or converting back to the normal sinus rhythm. Patient are often placed on blood thinners to prevent complications. Read more...