I am an adult who has never had chickenpox. Is there a vaccine I can get? My neighbor's children recently came down with chickenpox. I'm afraid I might catch it as an adult. What can I do to prevent infection? .

The . The following information is taken from the us cdc: varicella (chickenpox) is a highly contagious disease that is very uncomfortable and sometimes serious. The chickenpox vaccine is the best protection against chickenpox. The vaccine is made from weakened varicella virus that produces an immune response in your body that protects you against chickenpox. The chickenpox vaccine was licensed for use in the United States in 1995. Since then, the vaccine has become widely used. Thanks to the chickenpox vaccine, the number of people who get chickenpox each year as well as hospitalizations and deaths from chickenpox have gone down dramatically in the United States. Persons aged >13 years persons aged >13 years without evidence of varicella immunity should receive two 0.5-ml doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine administered subcutaneously, 4--8 weeks apart. If >8 weeks elapse after the first dose, the second dose may be administered without restarting the schedule. Only single-antigen varicella vaccine may be used for vaccination of persons in this age group. Mmrv is not licensed for use among persons aged >13 years. School-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions all students should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those without evidence of immunity should routinely receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. The risk for transmission of varicella among school-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions can be high because of high contact rates. Other adults all healthy adults should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those who do not have evidence of immunity should receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. Adults who might be at increased risk for exposure or transmission and who do not have evidence of immunity should receive special consideration for vaccination, including 1) hcp, 2) household contacts of immunocompromised persons, 3) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission of VZV is likely (e.g., teachers, day-care employees, residents and staff in institutional settings), 4) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission has been reported (e.g., college students, inmates and staff members of correctional institutions, and military personnel), 5) nonpregnant women of childbearing age, 6) adolescents and adults living in households with children, and 7) international travelers.