2 doctors weighed in:
What is an electrical shock delivered to the heart to correct abnormal heart rhythms called?
2 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Cardioversion-defib
An implantable aicd has cardioversion and defibrillation capabilities.
However, usually, it delivers a defibrillatory shock when it detects a dangerous rhythm. Of course, the energy is much lower since less tissue needs to be penetrated (the electrical lead goes directly into the heart).

In brief: Cardioversion-defib
An implantable aicd has cardioversion and defibrillation capabilities.
However, usually, it delivers a defibrillatory shock when it detects a dangerous rhythm. Of course, the energy is much lower since less tissue needs to be penetrated (the electrical lead goes directly into the heart).
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Thank
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
In brief: Cardioversion
If non-fatal (like atrial fibrillation), it's cardioversion in which a lower energy & specific electrical phase is given with the patient sedated but awake so that the rhythm can be converted to the normal, sinus rhythm.

In brief: Cardioversion
If non-fatal (like atrial fibrillation), it's cardioversion in which a lower energy & specific electrical phase is given with the patient sedated but awake so that the rhythm can be converted to the normal, sinus rhythm.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Thank
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
In brief: Defibrillation
If it's a potentially fatal heart rhythm (eg ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation), it's called defibrillation.
In this case, a large amount of energy is delivered directly to the heart to stop it so that the internal pacemaker can re-activate it to a (hopefully) normal rhythm. In all cases, CPR (chest compressions) are required as well.

In brief: Defibrillation
If it's a potentially fatal heart rhythm (eg ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation), it's called defibrillation.
In this case, a large amount of energy is delivered directly to the heart to stop it so that the internal pacemaker can re-activate it to a (hopefully) normal rhythm. In all cases, CPR (chest compressions) are required as well.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Thank
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