If my abi on my right dorsalis pedis is zero before a bypass surgery should it alarm the doctor if its zero after the surgery or should he have seen this on my record mine was zero and realized 1 out of 10 people don't have a pulse there anyway from what

The. The ankle-brachial index (abi) is a screening test that evaluates the likelihood of peripheral arterial blockage. It tests blood pressure in the dorsalis pedis and the posterior tibial arteries and compares those measurements to blood pressures in the arms. If the pressures in the feet are much lower than those in the arms, and/or the patient has clinical signs of decreased blood flow to the feet, then one may decide to intervene. Based on your question, I suspect that the abnormality was that you had no detectable pulse in your dorsalis pedis artery. That might cause the abi to be low, but an absent dp pulse and an abi of zero are not the same thing. In either case, your doctor apparently felt that it was appropriate to do a procedure to improve blood flow. He or she would certainly be worried if, after doing a procedure, the test that lead to that intervention showed no improvement. It would strngly suggest that you had gotten no benefit from the procedure and would still be at risk for the problems associated with decreased blood flow in the feet.

Related Questions

If mra showed abi on right dorsalis pedis is zero before surgery should doctor freak out after aortic bypass surgery o again then he does a r ileofemarol thrombolectomy and a intraoperative angiogram and a r distal pop-tibial exposure then a r greater sap

I. I believe that you also asked this question elsewhere, so escuse me if the first part of my answer is a repeat. The ankle-brachial index (abi) is a screening test done with blood pressure cuffs and an ultrasound probe. An mra, in contrast, uses magnetic fields and injected dye to directly visualize the anatomy of the blood vessels. Therefore, while an mra might show a blocked dorsalis pedis artery, it would not be reported as showing an abi of zero. The abi tests blood pressure in the dorsalis pedis and the posterior tibial arteries and compares those measurements to blood pressures in the arms. If the pressures in the feet are significantly lower than those in the arms, and/or the patient has clinical signs of decreased blood flow to the feet, then one may decide to intervene. It sounds to me like you had no pulse in your dorsais pedis artery before your surgery, regardless of what your abi might have been. This could have happened because of chronic blockage or because of new clot that might have formed a) because of decreased flow in an already-diseased dorsalis pedis or b) because of clot that came from abnormal vessels upstream. You had an aortic bypass, so there certainly was disease upstream. It sounds to me like your surgery was a difficult one. However, it's hard to know whether your doctor was fixing problems that were caused by the surgery or whether you just had a lot of disease to begin with and he or she was trying to fix a of of problems at the same time. Unfortunately, a lot of people with bad arterial disease wind up in a wheelchair or with amputations despite the best efforts of good doctors. Still, if you think your doctor made a mistake, you should certainly talk it over with him or her and consider seeing another doctor for a second opinion.
Complex. Complex situation. If abi 0 pre aortic surgery, and post-op, would expect it to be 0. Rest of procedures done to enhance blood flow to tibial vessels to improve distal runoff. Cannot speculate as to why you are a "cripple".