12 doctors weighed in:

Do kids with asperger's syndrome have problems with language?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Jacobs
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
7 doctors agree

In brief: Usually some

By definition, kids with asperger's disorder have relatively intact language ability.
A child with more severe language problems would be diagnosed with a more severe autistic spectrum disorder. That being said, kids with asperger's often have difficulty maintaining "normal" conversations, regulating tone of voice, catching other people's social cues and body language, and understanding humor.

In brief: Usually some

By definition, kids with asperger's disorder have relatively intact language ability.
A child with more severe language problems would be diagnosed with a more severe autistic spectrum disorder. That being said, kids with asperger's often have difficulty maintaining "normal" conversations, regulating tone of voice, catching other people's social cues and body language, and understanding humor.
Dr. Jeff Jacobs
Dr. Jeff Jacobs
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Dr. Michael Amster
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Sometimes

Asperger's is a high functioning form of autism, and as such, kids may not use language the way it would normally be used.
Many with asperger's use language in ways described as "stilted" and awkward. It's not that they have trouble speaking, but turns of phrase, common meanings, and "sayings" go by them, and they have trouble adapting to language in a local setting.

In brief: Sometimes

Asperger's is a high functioning form of autism, and as such, kids may not use language the way it would normally be used.
Many with asperger's use language in ways described as "stilted" and awkward. It's not that they have trouble speaking, but turns of phrase, common meanings, and "sayings" go by them, and they have trouble adapting to language in a local setting.
Dr. Michael Amster
Dr. Michael Amster
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Dr. William Singer
Pediatrics - Neurology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Language is literal

People with Asperger's disorder tend to interpret language literally.
They often do not understand nuances or humor in the same way other's their age their age do.

In brief: Language is literal

People with Asperger's disorder tend to interpret language literally.
They often do not understand nuances or humor in the same way other's their age their age do.
Dr. William Singer
Dr. William Singer
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Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral

In brief: Yes, with social

Communication, or pragmatic language, which is the give-&-take of converstion.
Vocabulary can be above average. They can expound on their narrow, repetitive areas of interest, but not recognize their audience's non-verbal cues to stop talking or allow them to respond. This is related to lack of theory of mind. Prosody, the inflections, cadence & rhthym of speech is often atypical, also.

In brief: Yes, with social

Communication, or pragmatic language, which is the give-&-take of converstion.
Vocabulary can be above average. They can expound on their narrow, repetitive areas of interest, but not recognize their audience's non-verbal cues to stop talking or allow them to respond. This is related to lack of theory of mind. Prosody, the inflections, cadence & rhthym of speech is often atypical, also.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
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