7 doctors weighed in:
Is it possible for food additives, such as e102, to cause adhd-like behavior in children?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
2 doctors agree
In brief: In a small number of
Children with adhd there is an allergic or pharmacologically mediated behavior change on exposure to some dyes (e.
g., tartrazine, quinolineyellow, sunset yellow, carmoisine, ponceau 4r, & allura red ) & sodium benzoate added to foods & medicines. If a child is allergic to certain foods or dyes & behavior changes can be seen with exposure, an elimination diet is worthwhile.

In brief: In a small number of
Children with adhd there is an allergic or pharmacologically mediated behavior change on exposure to some dyes (e.
g., tartrazine, quinolineyellow, sunset yellow, carmoisine, ponceau 4r, & allura red ) & sodium benzoate added to foods & medicines. If a child is allergic to certain foods or dyes & behavior changes can be seen with exposure, an elimination diet is worthwhile.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
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Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: YES
Its possible, if not likely, that food additives can increase the risk of behavior problems, including adhd.
Recent studies, including a large one conducted by the european food safety authority have deteced an increase in these behavior disorders with a diet higher in food additives. More research is needed but there does seem to be some data to support the link.

In brief: YES
Its possible, if not likely, that food additives can increase the risk of behavior problems, including adhd.
Recent studies, including a large one conducted by the european food safety authority have deteced an increase in these behavior disorders with a diet higher in food additives. More research is needed but there does seem to be some data to support the link.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
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Dr. Bryan Levey
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Possibly
Food additive, particularly artificial dyes, have been shown to cause hyperactive behavior in some children.
This has been a tough one for the medical community to accept, despite some pretty convincing studies that have been published. None of these dyes are necessary, and some of them aren't fit for human consumption, in my opinion. My advice: avoid artificial dyes.

In brief: Possibly
Food additive, particularly artificial dyes, have been shown to cause hyperactive behavior in some children.
This has been a tough one for the medical community to accept, despite some pretty convincing studies that have been published. None of these dyes are necessary, and some of them aren't fit for human consumption, in my opinion. My advice: avoid artificial dyes.
Dr. Bryan Levey
Dr. Bryan Levey
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1 comment
Dr. Bryan Levey
I agree with you; thanks for your input.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
In brief: Yes
Altho the research data supporting this notion is sparse, i believe that most of us believe there are children whose symptoms worsen from specific sensitivities.
Unfortunately only trial and error elimination diets seem to accurately identify these problems. And I do not believe that this is a common occurence.

In brief: Yes
Altho the research data supporting this notion is sparse, i believe that most of us believe there are children whose symptoms worsen from specific sensitivities.
Unfortunately only trial and error elimination diets seem to accurately identify these problems. And I do not believe that this is a common occurence.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
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