5 doctors weighed in:

Are dental x-rays taken on a baby's first visit to the dentist? My daughter's scheduled for her first visit to the dentist soon, and just has a few teeth. I'm a bit worried that dental x-rays could be harmful to her, so i'd like to know if they will be us

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Hart
Dentistry - Cosmetic
3 doctors agree

In brief: It

It all depends on the age of your child.
Typically it recommended that a parent take their child to the pediatric dentist at the age of one ("first tooth or first birthday"). This initial visit is usually a show and tell for the child and educational for the parent. The parent(s) are instructed in the do and don'ts of dental health and this can be invaluable in preventing avoidable dental problems in the future. Dental radiographs may be taken when more primary (baby) teeth are present in order to check for decay in between the teeth (i.e., areas dentists can't visualize). The xrays can also be very important to determine if the teeth are developing properly and to rule out cysts and supernumerary (extra) teeth. If they are recommended be assured that the dentist will use a protective shield and dental xray equipment that minimizes the exposure.

In brief: It

It all depends on the age of your child.
Typically it recommended that a parent take their child to the pediatric dentist at the age of one ("first tooth or first birthday"). This initial visit is usually a show and tell for the child and educational for the parent. The parent(s) are instructed in the do and don'ts of dental health and this can be invaluable in preventing avoidable dental problems in the future. Dental radiographs may be taken when more primary (baby) teeth are present in order to check for decay in between the teeth (i.e., areas dentists can't visualize). The xrays can also be very important to determine if the teeth are developing properly and to rule out cysts and supernumerary (extra) teeth. If they are recommended be assured that the dentist will use a protective shield and dental xray equipment that minimizes the exposure.
Dr. Steven Hart
Dr. Steven Hart
Thank
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dentistry - Orthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Probably not

She will need at some time x-rays to determine if all her permanent teeth are present, if they are in good position, and to show the parts of the erupted teeth and the bone support that can't be seen with the naked eye.
As she gets back teeth in, cavity detection x-rays will be required periodically. X-rays are safe, less radiation than 2 days on the beech or a day in the mountains skiing.

In brief: Probably not

She will need at some time x-rays to determine if all her permanent teeth are present, if they are in good position, and to show the parts of the erupted teeth and the bone support that can't be seen with the naked eye.
As she gets back teeth in, cavity detection x-rays will be required periodically. X-rays are safe, less radiation than 2 days on the beech or a day in the mountains skiing.
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Thank
1 doctor agrees

In brief: You

You don't say how old your daughter is, but if she only has a few teeth, i'm assuming around 2 years old.
Radiographs have the purpose of allowing us to "see" in areas that are not visible (between the teeth, in the bone, etc). Dentists will take them to ensure a thorough exam is given to the patient, or when they need to examine a particular problem. Dental radiographs are very, very low in strength and are non-harmful to the patient when taken for diagnostic purposes. That being said, i doubt your dentist will see a need to take them at her age since her teeth are probably in great shape, no cavities to be found. Ask him/her at the visit if they plan on taking the films and why. You do have the right to refuse the films if you wish.

In brief: You

You don't say how old your daughter is, but if she only has a few teeth, i'm assuming around 2 years old.
Radiographs have the purpose of allowing us to "see" in areas that are not visible (between the teeth, in the bone, etc). Dentists will take them to ensure a thorough exam is given to the patient, or when they need to examine a particular problem. Dental radiographs are very, very low in strength and are non-harmful to the patient when taken for diagnostic purposes. That being said, i doubt your dentist will see a need to take them at her age since her teeth are probably in great shape, no cavities to be found. Ask him/her at the visit if they plan on taking the films and why. You do have the right to refuse the films if you wish.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
14 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
111,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors