6 doctors weighed in:

Do children who are just getting their baby teeth need to see the dentist as often as adults? Our daughter just got her first tooth and i'm going to schedule her first visit to the dentist, and am wondering if she will also need to see the dentist every s

6 doctors weighed in
3 doctors agree

In brief: You

You ask an excellent question, and I am happy you have taken such a proactive approach to your daughter's health.
At six months old she is a bit young to be seen by a dentist. Her first tooth is probably not completely in yet, and there's not much a dentist could do for her at this age. What you should do, as a parent, is gently wipe those teeth with a soft clean cloth before she goes to bed, and never, ever, ever put her to sleep with a bottle of juice or milk in her mouth. The sugars from those liquids will be feeding the bacteria in har mouth all night long. Tha bacteria produce acids, which eat away at her teeth and cause a condition called "baby bottle syndrome". Plain water or a pacifier will not cause this problem. As she gets a bit older, you can start brushing her teeth for her. She will probably want to imitate mommy, so show her how. There will be slightly differing opinions as to what age to bring her in for her first real dental visit. I usually tell my patients when they ask me to bring them in at approximately 2 years old, give or take. It is not that they will need extensive dental care; its more for them to get use to the office, the surroundings, and most importantly going to a dental visit doesn't hurt! at that visit, we try to count the teeth, determine if there are any cavities, and if at all possible, try to gently polish the teeth. It can tickle, and most children do not have a problem with this. Hopefully she will never get cavities, but if she does, it will be only after many uneventful dental visits so the trust will already have been established. All the best.

In brief: You

You ask an excellent question, and I am happy you have taken such a proactive approach to your daughter's health.
At six months old she is a bit young to be seen by a dentist. Her first tooth is probably not completely in yet, and there's not much a dentist could do for her at this age. What you should do, as a parent, is gently wipe those teeth with a soft clean cloth before she goes to bed, and never, ever, ever put her to sleep with a bottle of juice or milk in her mouth. The sugars from those liquids will be feeding the bacteria in har mouth all night long. Tha bacteria produce acids, which eat away at her teeth and cause a condition called "baby bottle syndrome". Plain water or a pacifier will not cause this problem. As she gets a bit older, you can start brushing her teeth for her. She will probably want to imitate mommy, so show her how. There will be slightly differing opinions as to what age to bring her in for her first real dental visit. I usually tell my patients when they ask me to bring them in at approximately 2 years old, give or take. It is not that they will need extensive dental care; its more for them to get use to the office, the surroundings, and most importantly going to a dental visit doesn't hurt! at that visit, we try to count the teeth, determine if there are any cavities, and if at all possible, try to gently polish the teeth. It can tickle, and most children do not have a problem with this. Hopefully she will never get cavities, but if she does, it will be only after many uneventful dental visits so the trust will already have been established. All the best.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
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1 comment
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Recent research has shown that children who begin dental care with a Pediatric Dentist by age 1, as compared with children who begin dental care with a General Dentist at 2-3, have on average >40% less dental expenses by their 5th birthday. As competent as hour General Physician is, do you take your child to a Pediatric Medical Specialist?
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dentistry - Prosthodontics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Dr.

Dr. Devantzis, has just about nailed it with a very good reply.
I want to add one thing which directly answers the question about how often your little one needs to see the dentist. Here it what i find works best. Bring your baby to the dental office every time you have your teeth cleaned that should be every 4 - 6 months right? Let them get used to being in the environment and watch you have your teeth cleaned. Play showing the dentist how we clean our little darling's teeth a moist flannel and the later a brush, and then how you floss. It the process and evaluation can be made of how the teeth are erupting and what the overall health is like. This makes it much easier. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.

In brief: Dr.

Dr. Devantzis, has just about nailed it with a very good reply.
I want to add one thing which directly answers the question about how often your little one needs to see the dentist. Here it what i find works best. Bring your baby to the dental office every time you have your teeth cleaned that should be every 4 - 6 months right? Let them get used to being in the environment and watch you have your teeth cleaned. Play showing the dentist how we clean our little darling's teeth a moist flannel and the later a brush, and then how you floss. It the process and evaluation can be made of how the teeth are erupting and what the overall health is like. This makes it much easier. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dr. Neil McLeod
Thank
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dentistry - Orthodontics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Children and adults should be seen every 6 months.
Cranio-facial growth and development has to be monitored. Also, because the enamel in baby teeth is thinner and structured differently than permanent tooth enamel, if a cavity starts it can progress very rapidly. Dentist will want to monitor oral hygiene, sealants, fluoride, diet, etc. Good call to make appointment now.

In brief: Yes

Children and adults should be seen every 6 months.
Cranio-facial growth and development has to be monitored. Also, because the enamel in baby teeth is thinner and structured differently than permanent tooth enamel, if a cavity starts it can progress very rapidly. Dentist will want to monitor oral hygiene, sealants, fluoride, diet, etc. Good call to make appointment now.
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Thank
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