13 doctors weighed in:

Can a permanent tooth come in while a baby tooth is still in place? I've noticed what looks like another tooth coming in behind one of the baby teeth in the front of our daughter's mouth. Is this possible? Is this something i need to call my dentist about

13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dentistry - Orthodontics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Very common

We see this a lot, especially in children with arch length insufficiency (crowding).
As a general rule children should have their first check up with a qualified orthodontic specialist at age 7. This is especially true if you, as a non-dentist, recognize that there are anomalies. Please ask your general dentist for a referral now. There is nothing to be gained by waiting.

In brief: Very common

We see this a lot, especially in children with arch length insufficiency (crowding).
As a general rule children should have their first check up with a qualified orthodontic specialist at age 7. This is especially true if you, as a non-dentist, recognize that there are anomalies. Please ask your general dentist for a referral now. There is nothing to be gained by waiting.
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dr. Arnold Malerman
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Dr. Howard Schneider
Dentistry - Pediatric
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

We see this alot.
It is most common on the bottom front. If they are not in pain i usually tell parents to give 2 weeks for the offending baby tooth to fall out. If super loose after 2 weeks then give a few more days. If still there after that time then the baby tooh should removed by your dentist to allow the permanent tooth room to straighten out.

In brief: Yes

We see this alot.
It is most common on the bottom front. If they are not in pain i usually tell parents to give 2 weeks for the offending baby tooth to fall out. If super loose after 2 weeks then give a few more days. If still there after that time then the baby tooh should removed by your dentist to allow the permanent tooth room to straighten out.
Dr. Howard Schneider
Dr. Howard Schneider
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Dr. Gregory LaMorte
Dentistry - Periodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

This is one of the causes of malposed permanent teeth that can lead to the need for orthodontics.
Wait a week or two, if the baby tooth does not become very loose of come out on its own, call your dentist.

In brief: Yes

This is one of the causes of malposed permanent teeth that can lead to the need for orthodontics.
Wait a week or two, if the baby tooth does not become very loose of come out on its own, call your dentist.
Dr. Gregory LaMorte
Dr. Gregory LaMorte
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Dr. Harry Aronowitz
Dentistry - Orthodontics

In brief: If

If a permanent tooth erupts alongside of the baby tooth it was supposed to replace, it usually means that the baby tooth is over-retained and since the adult tooth completely missed resorting the root of the baby tooth (airball!).
Because the baby tooth did not completely resorb it probably will not fall out on it's own. The sooner you have the baby tooth removed by a dentist, the better the chance that the adult tooth will find it's way into that space.

In brief: If

If a permanent tooth erupts alongside of the baby tooth it was supposed to replace, it usually means that the baby tooth is over-retained and since the adult tooth completely missed resorting the root of the baby tooth (airball!).
Because the baby tooth did not completely resorb it probably will not fall out on it's own. The sooner you have the baby tooth removed by a dentist, the better the chance that the adult tooth will find it's way into that space.
Dr. Harry Aronowitz
Dr. Harry Aronowitz
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Dr. Steven Hart
Dentistry - Cosmetic

In brief: This

This is a relatively common eruption pattern for permanent teeth and you should not panic.
In most cases a dentist will let nature take its course and allow the primary (baby) tooth to exfoliate (i.e., root resorb and the tooth loosen and fall out). However, the dentist should make the determination as to whether the primary tooth for some reason is impeding the eruption of the permanent tooth and possibly creating a situation where the permanent tooth will not be able to attain its ideal position. In rare cases the primary tooth is ankylosed, meaning fused to the bone and normal exfoliation may not occur. A dental exam and xrays can be of great benefit to make the correct determination as to the course to follow.

In brief: This

This is a relatively common eruption pattern for permanent teeth and you should not panic.
In most cases a dentist will let nature take its course and allow the primary (baby) tooth to exfoliate (i.e., root resorb and the tooth loosen and fall out). However, the dentist should make the determination as to whether the primary tooth for some reason is impeding the eruption of the permanent tooth and possibly creating a situation where the permanent tooth will not be able to attain its ideal position. In rare cases the primary tooth is ankylosed, meaning fused to the bone and normal exfoliation may not occur. A dental exam and xrays can be of great benefit to make the correct determination as to the course to follow.
Dr. Steven Hart
Dr. Steven Hart
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In brief: Yes,

Yes, it can. And most often does, on what i think you are referring to for your daughter, her lower front teeth.
As permanent teeh grow, the push up on the baby tooth, causing the root on the baby tooth to resorb. That's why when baby teel fall out, they often don't have a root attached. Your daughters permanent incisor is erupting a bit lingual to her baby tooth. As that tooth erupts, her tongue (a very stong muscle) should push it a bit forward into it's proper place. Without an exam, i cannot advise you if the baby tooth needs to be extracted now, or whether it can wait until her next checkup and exam. If she has a small jaw and her teeth are crowded, there is no room for the permanent tooth to go anywhere. If she's been to a dentist regularly, there is absolutely no harm in having him/her take a look. If she has not been to the dentist regularly, now is the time to start.

In brief: Yes,

Yes, it can. And most often does, on what i think you are referring to for your daughter, her lower front teeth.
As permanent teeh grow, the push up on the baby tooth, causing the root on the baby tooth to resorb. That's why when baby teel fall out, they often don't have a root attached. Your daughters permanent incisor is erupting a bit lingual to her baby tooth. As that tooth erupts, her tongue (a very stong muscle) should push it a bit forward into it's proper place. Without an exam, i cannot advise you if the baby tooth needs to be extracted now, or whether it can wait until her next checkup and exam. If she has a small jaw and her teeth are crowded, there is no room for the permanent tooth to go anywhere. If she's been to a dentist regularly, there is absolutely no harm in having him/her take a look. If she has not been to the dentist regularly, now is the time to start.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
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Dr. Neil McLeod
Dentistry - Prosthodontics

In brief: It

It sometimes happens that children have a growth spurt or have displaced their first teeth with a pacifier, or simply have tooth size and jaw size that do not quite match.
The result can be that erupting secondary teeth do not cause the preceding teeth to resorb and the erupting teeth are displaced. When this occurs it has the appearance two row of teeth. You should see you dentist and have the condition carefully evalauted. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.

In brief: It

It sometimes happens that children have a growth spurt or have displaced their first teeth with a pacifier, or simply have tooth size and jaw size that do not quite match.
The result can be that erupting secondary teeth do not cause the preceding teeth to resorb and the erupting teeth are displaced. When this occurs it has the appearance two row of teeth. You should see you dentist and have the condition carefully evalauted. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dr. Neil McLeod
Thank
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